waterfalls?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Abby Rose, Sep 23, 2010.

  1. Abby Rose

    Abby Rose TPF Noob!

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    So, for the pictures of the waterfalls where it's daytime outside but the water is still smooth, how is that done without the picture turing out outrageously bright and blown? Is it an ND filter, or are all these pictures actually taken in dusky light, or is there some super secret method that I havent heard about? Just wondering.

    Also, does it seem like everyone on this forum is really growly and short lately, or is that just me? :???:
     
  2. Blake.Oney

    Blake.Oney TPF Noob!

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    An ND filter, smaller aperture (higher number), exposure comp, or wait until there is less light to name a few.
     
  3. LarryD

    LarryD TPF Noob!

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    I can't comment about the members......... I'm always cranky until I have a couple of cups of coffee in me...........:D

    As to waterfalls... The water moves pretty fast and so you only need a half second or so exposure for good effect. Of course, you can expose for quite a bit longer if you want..

    Like any well exposed photograph, you always need to adjust your camera to get the desired effect.. If you want a second of shutter speed, you need to close down the aperture and lower the ISO to get there.. If it's still too bright, you need to put on a filter that blocks some of the light.. A polarizer is good for a stop or two, and an ND filter for even more.... or you could go old-school and hold a piece of dark glass in front of the lens.:mrgreen:
     
  4. skieur

    skieur TPF Noob!

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    There is no standard procedure for photographing a waterfall. Slow shutterspeeds only work when the waterfall is evenly lit. If it is not, the part in bright sunlight will be blown out in comparison with the part in the shade.
    To get the veil look, you need the right amount of water going over, as well as slow shutterspeed. Otherwise it looks like you goofed, by not chosing the correct shutterspeed.

    The best approach is using a polarizing filter and experimenting with a number of shutterspeeds. What you are after is NO blown out highlights, a veil look, and a very slight surface texture. In some cases a very fast shutterspeed may be the answer for the particular falls and the individual lighting situation.

    skieur
     

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