Wax

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by David J. Woodruff, Aug 6, 2006.

  1. David J. Woodruff

    David J. Woodruff TPF Noob!

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    I once saw the work of an artist who "waxed" his inkjet prints.
    Apparently this used to be a common practice for sealing photographs.

    Any info on wax products/practices?
     
  2. David J. Woodruff

    David J. Woodruff TPF Noob!

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  3. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    While I can see waxing my fiber base, gelatin silver prints, I'm not sure the matte ink-jet prints I get would stand up to the rubbing necessary. The blacks scuff pretty easily. I need a spray on or dunk in sealer.
     
  4. mysteryscribe

    mysteryscribe TPF Noob!

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    I tried to clean a stain off a kodak dye sub print and it just disolved in my hand. Well not the base but the colors.
     
  5. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Well, . . .

    First, a disclaimer. I've used the products mentioned below, but not in your specific application. Caveat emptor.

    If you're in the mood to experiment, you might get hold of a can of pastel fixative at your local art supply store. This is an acrylate, related to hair spray. [In fact, for a really quick test, just use hair spray. It's got all sorts of additives which may discolor with time, though.] When sprayed on a pastel drawing, it forms a protective film and holds the pigments in place. Pastels are nothing but pigment in a soft chalky base.

    Try it on a simple ink-jet print on standard photo paper or, say, Hammermill OfficeOne 32# stock [An interesting low-cost alternative to ink-jet photo paper.] You might need more than one coat before the ink will withstand the waxing process with its wipe-on application and polishing.

    If you are using a paste wax, sprinkle cornstarch on your cloth prior to polishing. Speeds up the process something fierce. It's also a bit messy. Cornstarch works well with old-fashioned paste car waxes when polishing your car, too.
     
  6. mysteryscribe

    mysteryscribe TPF Noob!

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    Back when I was experimenting with the new digital processes, I had some cardstock that was smooth not like index cards but almost slick. After ink jet finished I sprayed it with clear acrylic from the home depot... I was amazed how much better the print looked. It held up pretty well except in sunlight. But a spill didn't hurt it at all. And the colors were so much better under the slight gloss. It even looked some sharper for some reason.

    But my favorite paper was a lighweight water color paper. It absorbed the ink and blurred a little. It looked more like a painting than a print.
     

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