Wedding Photographers - What's your gear preference/recommendation, and why?

Discussion in 'General Shop Talk' started by Buckster, Oct 22, 2009.

?

Wedding Photographers - What's your gear preference/recommendation?

  1. "Pro-sumer" DSLR

    12 vote(s)
    46.2%
  2. High-End DSLR

    12 vote(s)
    46.2%
  3. 35mm Film

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. Medium Format Film

    1 vote(s)
    3.8%
  5. Other

    1 vote(s)
    3.8%
  1. Buckster

    Buckster Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2009
    Messages:
    6,399
    Likes Received:
    2,334
    Location:
    Way up North in Michigan
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Title pretty much says it all:

    Wedding Photographers - What's your gear preference/recommendation, and why?
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2003
    Messages:
    33,822
    Likes Received:
    1,811
    Location:
    Edmonton
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I moved this to the 'shop talk' section and out of the 'gallery' section.

    Tough question, you really need to consider things like budget.
    If money were no issue, I would probably like to shoot with high end DSLR but might even shoot with MF digital cameras. The cost of digital MF is astronomical, not to mention that the files and processing power/time required to work with them would be an issue...but if you don't handle that yourself directly, who cares :).
    Pro DSLR bodies are probably the most advanced tools, so they might be a better option, even over MF (film or digital). Super fast AF, multi-zoom matrix metering...all that good stuff. Not to mention that they can up be around 20 MP now...so you have huge digital files if you need them.

    But then the question is....is that overkill? With some skill and talent, can't you make up for those features using a pro-sumer camera? Heck, the latest pro-sumer bodies are a lot better than the pro digital bodies they had 5 years ago.
    So what's the main difference between the pro bodies and the pro-sumers? Build quality and robustness is one. It's nice to have a tool that is darn near indestructible, but it that worth the extra size, weight and cost?
    Full frame vs crop sensor size is an issue here as well. Personally, I think that there are pros and cons to each. I know a very good wedding shooter who carries 1.6 crop, 1.3 crop and full frame (Canon) bodies to each wedding. He even has a full frame Nikon, just for kicks.
    Some would assume that just using the full frame pro body all the time, would be the best option. But he doesn't hesitate to use a 40D in many situations, and actually prefers it for some.

    What was the question again :scratch: :lol:
     
  3. joemc

    joemc TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2009
    Messages:
    296
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    Ft Lauderdale
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    High end DSLR.... for two main reasons.

    1. can shoot at high ISO
    2. can shoot at high ISO

    Some (most) churches do not allow flash during the ceremony!

    Also...the files look better coming out of the camera and that means less time editing.

    Cheers, Joe

    Disclaimer.... I am not a wedding photog..... But many many of my friends are..... But they prefer to be called "event photograpers"
     
  4. SpeedTrap

    SpeedTrap TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2006
    Messages:
    1,392
    Likes Received:
    26
    Location:
    Edmonton
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I for one tend to stick to the higher end Bodies and Glass.

    The reason for this is that the performance in both the glass and camera bodies as well as the ruggedness. I need to be able to change settings on my cameras on the fly using only dials and buttons on the body; I do now want to have to go into the menus to make changes. I also need to be able to hang my cameras off me and not worry it they take a bump that they will break.

    The second reason is vanity. I will not lie.
    When I show up to shoot an event, I do not want to be carrying the same camera as “Uncle Bob”. Sure consumer SLRs are advancing, but they just are not robust enough for a fast passed environment.

    I am a paid professional and the High End or Pro SLR offers me better bang for my buck in terms of longevity.
     
  5. Christie Photo

    Christie Photo No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2005
    Messages:
    7,006
    Likes Received:
    67
    Location:
    Kankakee, IL
    Well, you'd have to be nuts to shoot film. When I shot my last film wedding, the cost was about $1 every time I tripped the shutter (No.. you can't shoot weddings with 35mm film and drug store processing). I suspect it would be more now with the added expense of scanning for web galleries.

    "Pro-sumer," high-end.... doesn't matter much as long as its a fairly new SLR and can be set manually.

    -Pete
     
  6. Mike_E

    Mike_E No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2007
    Messages:
    5,327
    Likes Received:
    264
    Location:
    The Upper West Side of Mississippi (you have no i
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    What he said^. :)

    Medium priced bodies (minimum) for durability. High quality glass for obvious reasons.

    If you are consistent (and good ;))then even a freeware photo editing program will do for post processing. Even if you are doing coffee table albums.
     
  7. camz

    camz No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2009
    Messages:
    1,878
    Likes Received:
    284
    Location:
    Bay Area
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    My Canon 20D and 5D are both over 4 years old and probably have over 150K actuations each. They serve my purpose and honestly I treat these guys almost like my children. They are very well maintained and stored away when not in use and I personally don't expose them to elements of mother nature much. At the time when I purchased them the 20D was the best 1.6 cropped body and the 5D was the cheapest Full Frame Canon had available in the market. Since then they have never broken down on me and I had never once sent them for pro maintenance or repair. The only time I had an issue was when my 20D just froze during a gig and in order to resolve the issue I had to perform a hard shutdown by removing the battery from the compartment(no big issue). What led me to the conlcusion to buy these two was: Research, research, research. After my brain was filled with all this data of all the features that met my needs I tested them for egonomics and loved it.

    I've been shooting portraiture quite some time now and weddings for close to 4 seasons and I must say they've met my needs. I've actually just purchased the Canon 5D Mark II b/c my 20 D is going to be my daughters so I'm really excited and hope that this will serve me as long and as reliable as the other did. With that being said the 5D Mark II is the entry level Full Frame that Canon offers and if my original 5D served me right I can't wait to see how much I can push this new gear to the limits.

    So my recommendation for anybody is to define your needs and cross compare them to the various models(lenses too) out there and see if the partnership between the photographer and camera jive together. Too me buying equipment that is over speced to to the photographer is a waste. If one is unable to push their gear to the limit why bother? If it's a business your running why increase the unnecessary overhead cost. Now there's nothing wrong with purchasing over speced equipment if that's the image that the business wants to portray to the market. But personally I want my work and photography to market itself where the equipment that serves me as a tool isn't relative to how the business is perceived. Also if the equipment is not taken for granted it will obviously last a great deal IMHO.

    Sorry Op it's not quite specific but rather a concept. Good luck!
     
  8. CSR Studio

    CSR Studio TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2009
    Messages:
    456
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Georgia
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I shoot medium format digital. I always shot medium format film so it was the likely progression.
     
  9. FrankLamont

    FrankLamont TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    Messages:
    556
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Are you asking specifics or what?

    Like out of that list, or choice in body + lens combo(s)?
     
  10. Buckster

    Buckster Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2009
    Messages:
    6,399
    Likes Received:
    2,334
    Location:
    Way up North in Michigan
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Just Camera body / format really. The rest is sort of implied. :thumbup:;)

    Feel free to go into as much detail as you like though, especially regarding WHY that works for you, or why something on that list in particular doesn't work for you.

    Thanks!
     
  11. haring

    haring TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2009
    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Miami, FL
    I think the camera is less important! Rather ask what lens!!!!
     
  12. Clawed

    Clawed TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2009
    Messages:
    426
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    Arizona
    I just shot my first paid gig this past weekend and I used a Canon 40D & Canon 450D (it was a backyard wedding so the only two lenses I used were my 24-70mm 2.8L on the 40, along with my 50mm 1.8 on the XSi). I would prefer a full-frame body with better ISO performance, but I need to do a few more weddings before I can afford one :D

    I realize it's definitely a matter of preference, but if you know what you're doing, you can make it work even with an entry-level DSLR. In fact, the best pics from the wedding were shot with the 50mm/XSi combo.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

photographer's preference