wedding photography

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by photojenic, Mar 16, 2004.

  1. photojenic

    photojenic TPF Noob!

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    anyone out there do weddings ? I need some help with dealing with the sun ...I've always had an overcast day and now i am sure I will get a wedding with full sun ....i need help on where to shoot with the sun ...against it or have it behind me ...then what if they squint
    thanks
    jen
     
  2. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Put them in the shade. Use a skylight or warming filter as the light in the shade will appear slightly blue on the pics (color film). You can also use a flash in the shade.

    Or you can put them out in the sun with it somewhere behind them, and use a flash to eliminate contrasty shadows. The sun cannot be in front of them; they will squint awfully. The closer the sun is to the image frame, the more likely you will get flare. I try to arrange it so that I'm at 6:00, the people are at 12:00, and the sun is at 10:00 or 2:00 (but still behind them). Metering into the sun can be tricky with an in-camera meter. Meter the subjects close up to avoid the back lighting problems. Typical advice is to set flash to under expose one stop; this lowers shadow contrast but still looks natural. But other photogs I like even over expose one stop. So practice and see what you like.
     
  3. photojenic

    photojenic TPF Noob!

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  4. photojenic

    photojenic TPF Noob!

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    I have to buy a light meter ...any suggestions and something that is affordable
    thanks
    jen
     
  5. avanti

    avanti TPF Noob!

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    We always shoot into the sun with -1 fill-in flash and get nice results, the lower the sun the nicer it is, watch out for flare though.
    We have been accused of doing this on purpose so that nobody else`s pix will come out!
     
  6. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    An inexpensive incidence (measures light falling on subject) meter would be fine. Although flash and spot meters can come in handy, so you might look at something that has all 3. I use a Sekonic 508. Expensive at first, but cheaper than buying three seperate meters.
     
  7. havoc

    havoc Jedi something or other

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    A Pentax zone V or VI works really well for quick spot metering and can be had on Ebay for about $150. It doesn't do flash but those can also be had for about $100. Those together may actually be cheaper then the Sektonic, though its a very nice one.
     
  8. photojenic

    photojenic TPF Noob!

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    what exactly would a flash meter do ?
    compared to one that doesn't ??
     
  9. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    A flash meter is designed to measure flash. It works just like your regular meter, but if you tried to measure a 1/10000th sec flash with a reg meter you could never catch the reading. The flash meter waits for a burst of light, and keeps that reading.
     

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