What Can I Do To Replicate This Style?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by binglemybongle, Dec 1, 2005.

  1. binglemybongle

    binglemybongle TPF Noob!

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    Hi to all.


    Can anyone give me tips or methods they've used to replicate this kind of silver screen look?

    http://www.bttw.co.uk/stills/0400.htm


    I'm asking more on the side of which film type and speed, lenses, filters, shutter speeds etc.

    I'm not against it but I'd prefer not to use Photo Shop or similar. This is for two reasons:

    1. I don't like to edit things. If I can't get it right from the start I'd rather try again.

    2. I don't have Photo Shop!!!


    Any existing methods people have used or proposed (previously untried) techniques are welcome.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman shot in B&W with a smoke machine providing the backdrop and circa 1942 technology probably help with this particular still!

    Seriously though, what aspect of the shot or genre are you trying to recreate? Generally speaking, the films were grainier and the lenses softer at the edges in those days, so perhaps this is a starting point.

    Rob
     
  3. binglemybongle

    binglemybongle TPF Noob!

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    Im thinking of the general area of portraiture. I know its quite general but basically looking for the same mood.

    The shots will be staged so don't need to worry about Play Station posters or whatever.

    I was thinking if anyone could start off by recommending a filter, Can you get "softening filters" to reduce sharpness without loss of focus?

    Are there special films that give a more silvery effect or again abother filter?

    Shutter speeds?

    Pushing/pulling?

    Asking for the negs to be developed using a different process - I wont be processing or developing my self.
     
  4. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    Softening filters are called diffusers and are available very cheaply. Read off your chosen lens at the top where there is a crossed o symbol and a measurement in mm for the diameter. Softening or diffusing by it's very nature scatters some of the light to soften the focus, so you will notice a flattering, yet slightly not sharp image. Filter effects systems are the cheapest road in - check out Cokin filter systems.

    The silvery effect is normally just a good exposure with excellent tonal qualities. You can do things like chrome toning, but if you aren't doing it yourself, it's unlikely that a lab will be able to achieve the effect you're after.

    All this kind of stuff is what PS is designed for and as a beginner it's the easiest way to experiment to achieve effects.
     
  5. KevinR

    KevinR TPF Noob!

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    If your really looking to recreate that feel, then use a film that was around then. TriX B&W. You can create that feel through the darkroom, but this probably isn't a great option for you. You really need to experiment with the lighting to get what your looking for. I don't really think a filter is the way to go with this.
     
  6. Mumfandc

    Mumfandc TPF Noob!

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    That picture sample you gave looks like a regular B&W photo, just dodged to hell in some parts.

    If you want old skool films, try Efke. You get it at http://www.jandcphotography.com
     
  7. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    It's all in the lighting.
     
  8. Canon Fan

    Canon Fan TPF Noob!

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    Personally I would just get an OLD camera and then shoot OLD film! I have a couple shots from an argoflex E (circa 1943ish) on ilford BW that look pretty old. Maybe older than you are looking for though :er:
     
  9. binglemybongle

    binglemybongle TPF Noob!

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    I have a Rolleicord Vb. I know it's not ancient but hopefully and minor imperfections may give desired results.

    I get the feeling the film is going to be most important though. A few people have said "OLD FILM".

    Film that is used nowadays may well have been around in the same era but i'm assuming it will have been developed (pardon the pun) over the time inbetween.

    Is there a chance using VERY low quality b/w film will help?

    If so, can anyone think of the lowest quality b/w film on offer.... from anywhere?
     
  10. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    It's nothing whatsoever to do with the film or the camera.
    It is all in the lighting!
     
  11. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    Lime light knowing you!
     
  12. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    I agree %100. Photography is all about light. That's a web resolution jpg that has been resized and compressed. You can't make assumptions about lens softness, or film resolution.
     

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