What film do you reccomend?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by zedin, Jun 23, 2005.

  1. zedin

    zedin TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Well traditionally I have done still nature shots so have been shooting fuji velvia or provia. However I am wanting to move into doing some wildlife shots and have never had any luck when shooting with a 100speed film due to light. Are there any recommendations as to what slide film (or print if you think it might be better) I might try in the 200 or 400 speed range? Or should I stick with my 100 speed and just try harder =p. What do others shoot for wildlife (those that still use film =p)
     
  2. EmergentFungus

    EmergentFungus TPF Noob!

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    I'll sneak another question in... What do the speeds on 35mm film do?
     
  3. zedin

    zedin TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Well film speeds for 35mm film (or really all film) is how 'fast' the film is. In other words how much light is needed to properly expose the film. A film at 200 speed is twice as fast as 100 and requires only half as much light to expose properly. However the trade off is higher speed films have larger grain size and things can start to get fuzzy in the 400 and up range (espcially with print film). However if you are shooting in low light you might not have any alternatives to using a high speed film.
     
  4. tr0gd0o0r

    tr0gd0o0r TPF Noob!

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    all film has very small light sensitive particles on it (i believe they're silver of some sort, i could be very wrong though) The speed of the film is a reference to the size of these particles. The high the iso is bigger the particles. The larger they are, the less light it takes to expose each one of these particles. however, the downside (potentially) is that the larger the particles are the easier they are to see. Being able to see the particles is what we call grain.
     
  5. Smith2688

    Smith2688 TPF Noob!

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    Speed = ISO

    I'm shooting Fuji Superia X-Tra 400 and it's quite good. However, I do warn you that my knowledge of film isn't that extensive. I'd get a couple test rolls of different films (including Kodak Porfessional UC) and give them a go.
     
  6. voodoocat

    voodoocat ))<>(( Supporting Member

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    Provia does make 400 and it's as small of grain as you'll get with 400 speed film.

    On the other hand.... get yourself a faster lens ;)
     
  7. binglemybongle

    binglemybongle TPF Noob!

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    No you are right. Well its silver halide crystal which are light sensitive. I think its the concentration (ie proportions of silverhalide) which determine how sensitive the film is.

    Although im not sure if this is just for black/white or colour as well.
     

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