What filters exactly do I need to protect lenses?

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by Leftyplayer, Jul 13, 2010.

  1. Leftyplayer

    Leftyplayer TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2010
    Messages:
    157
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    New York
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Got the camera. Will be getting the bag and a flash. Already have an old tripod. I need filters (just to protect the lenses) and lense cleaning stuff. But when I checked Adorama, they have like a gabilliion different filters there. I have the Canon Rebel kit lenses (18-55mm and 55-200mm). What filter do I need for these guys just for the purpose of putting something at the end that will protect the lense? I'm not looking for fancy filters yet. Just can't figure it out by looking at the website. And what cleaning equipment do I need?
     
  2. gryphonslair99

    gryphonslair99 Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2006
    Messages:
    11,437
    Likes Received:
    2,095
    Location:
    Wichita, Kansas, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
  3. kundalini

    kundalini Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2007
    Messages:
    13,601
    Likes Received:
    1,929
    Location:
    State of Confusion
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Instead of a 'protective' lens filter, I use my lens hoods and common sense. If I were to be close to the action of a moto-cross event or a sandstorm in the desert, that might be a time to reconsider.

    If you're going to buy anyway, don't cheap out.

    I do suggest a CPL (circular polarizer) and an ND (neautral density) or two and to a lesser extent a GND (graduated neautral density) might come in handy.

    Thom Hogan says.........
    Filters by Thom Hogan
     
  4. Vinny

    Vinny TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2010
    Messages:
    667
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    There are 2 schools of thought - Put a clear or UV filter on (old school) and go without (new school). I am old school and decided to use a UV filter for protection of the front lens element.

    I agree on the polarizer but not so much on the ND.
     
  5. Lipoly

    Lipoly TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 27, 2010
    Messages:
    145
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    St. Louis
    I used an old crappy P&S as a test to see how resilient the glass on these things can be. This POS camera was virtually impervious to any normal wear and tear. Dust will absolutely not in any circumstance scratch the lens, no matter how hard you rub it against the lens (in my "tests"). If you are unfortunate (dumb) enough to rub a very hard substance against the lens then...(spouts random derogatory statements).

    I use a lens hood to keep dust to a minimum. Unless you are shooting in a desert, I don't think a "protective filter" is in any way helpful...especially w/the horror stories of a dropped camera's broken filter actually scratching the lens it was supposed to protect. The glass on a good quality lens is extremely hard...doesn't scratch easily.

    The only question I have is whether the various coatings these lenses have are impacted by frequent cleanings...I'd think not but just don't know for sure.
     
  6. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2009
    Messages:
    38,211
    Likes Received:
    5,000
    Location:
    Iowa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I am old school too, and have never used a UV or any other filter for 'protection' and don't recommend they be used for that purpose. They are an unnecessary expense, IMO.

    When I shot film I used to a UV filter on ocassion to pre-process a negative, but then off it came.

    Digital image sensors have a built-in UV filter so one on the front of a lens will not improve your photo, but a cheap one can make your photos worse.

    Adding glass to the front of a lens adds problems: lens flare, loss of contrast, and when shattered or broken, sharp shards of glass that can actually damage the lens front objective it was intended to 'protect'.

    A UV/clear filter is a thin, flat piece of glass. Lenses objectives tend to be thicker and many are backed by correcting lens elements that make the entire group much stronger.

    A lens hood designed for your lens will not add problems, in fact is solves some like the already mentioned lens flare and contrast loss. a lens hood also provides a 'safe zone' around the front lens element.

    Nothing provides better protection than good camera handeling technique, and basic common sense and situational awareness.

    Check out this example of "Front Element Scratches":
    http://www.lensrentals.com/news/2008.10.30/front-element-scratches
     
  7. DennyCrane

    DennyCrane No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2009
    Messages:
    1,375
    Likes Received:
    34
    Location:
    The arctic North Coast
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I don't use anything to protect the lens. I keep the cap on when I'm not shooting and that's it.

    and there's this...

    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vzOLbMPe0u8[/ame]
     
  8. Vinny

    Vinny TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2010
    Messages:
    667
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Back in the 70's I only shot slide film and always kept the UV filter on - never a problem; I bought a rubber lens hood to counter lens flare. The comon thought around what I've read back then and to other amateur people was to get a UV and leave it on. I agree about being careful, using cheap filters and lens flare but I find using the new lens with it's hood a PITA and maybe it's that I'm not used to it. Personally I have never had anything bad happen to my lens so I can't speak of any misfortunes other than a dead camera battery.
     
  9. kundalini

    kundalini Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2007
    Messages:
    13,601
    Likes Received:
    1,929
    Location:
    State of Confusion
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    DennyCrane: I nearly soiled myself when he took the claw end to the lens. :biglaugh: Cheers.....
     
  10. Wheels47130

    Wheels47130 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2010
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dayton Beach FL
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I don't use a filter. I have the L series Canon lenses and can't see spending that much money on great glass to cover it with a filter. Just be careful with or without a filter.
     
  11. emh

    emh TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2010
    Messages:
    181
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    CA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Wow, that's amazing! Here I am trying to avoid even the slightest scratches on my lenses (not that I'm going to stop...) Thanks for the link.
     
  12. Vinny

    Vinny TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2010
    Messages:
    667
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    OK, I learned something today! I was putting on a new camera strap so that I don't scream NIKON in bright yellow and the stupid lens hood was sitting on the bottom of the bag where it normally sits after falling off. I put the hood on the lens and it was just flopping around until I decided to turn it a little further than where it usually stopped - CLICK - it stayed in place ... maybe it's not as stupid as I thought ... it's the stupid operator of a lens hood!! :blushing:

     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

do i need a filter to protect my lens