What filters for my application?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by KooK, Jan 30, 2009.

  1. KooK

    KooK TPF Noob!

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    I'm not about to sit here and tell people I don't have a budget for filters, but in the same respect, I'm not going to ask for the cheapest one. I have NO idea what I'm talking about when it comes to filters, I don't own any, I don't really even know where to start researching them without worry that the source is bias in any way. I'm looking to stay around or below $100 a filter and I'm wondering what 2-3 filters you guys would recommend for somebody just starting out. My equipment is listed in my sig, I'm trying to stay away from using a flash until I learn the logistics of the camera and how to use it a little better.

    From what I've at least been researching, I'm thinking of starting with a UV Filter, a ND Filter, and maybe a Polarizing filter of some sort. I will still research what anybody points me to, but I want to see if these are good starters, and what brand and spec to look for.

    I appreciate this a bunch, thanks in advance!

    P.S.
    I mostly do a lot of outdoors and moving shots, a close second will be things like cars that are just sitting there either out in the light, in a parking garage, it really varies.

    Edit: I'm sorry, I didn't see there was a separate sub-section for equipment, could a moderator or admin please move this? Thanks.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2009
  2. sultan

    sultan TPF Noob!

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    Yeah, I think a UV and Polarizing filter would be a good place to start. You should have a good quality UV filter on all your lenses all the time to protect them from damage. A polarizer would also be a good idea. I recommend Hoya filters if you want something that is both affordable and good quality. Tiffen UV filters are good if you want a simple and rugged filter. B+W filters are of very good quality (German made), but are expensive. But then having something that says "Made in Germany" makes me feel good inside, because I can be confident it won't reduce the lens's optical quality.

    I'm not sure about the ND - what are you planning on using it for? Do you want to do extra-long exposures? Get one if you thing you'll need one. Also consider getting 2 polarizers instead of an ND set. When you put 2 polarizers together, one in front of another, you get a variable ND filter. Simply rotate the polarizer to adjust opacity.

    P.S. Make sure you get a "circular polarizer" if you shoot digital. Regular polarizers sometimes don't work well on digital cameras.
     
  3. Mgw189

    Mgw189 TPF Noob!

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    Circular Polarizer
    Graduate ND filter
    UV filter
     
  4. kn4ds

    kn4ds TPF Noob!

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    Investigate the Cokin Creative Filter system... the A series allows you to "stack" up to 3 filters in front of the lens.

    One of the beauties of this system is that when you move to a new camera, if the lens barrel is a different size, you only need to get a new adapter ring, as I just did for the Canon Rebel XS (58mm) after years of using it with my Minolta (52mm).

    $8, and I can use all my Cokin filters with the new camera... sure beats having to buy all new filters.

    That said, I do recommend the UV (mostly for protection of the front lens element) and a good circular polarizing filter in your lens size.

    But Cokin has a WIDE variety of creative filters, including basics like graduated neutral density (have to be careful to re-orient them on an autofocus lens!), various colors, star filters, etc, etc.

    I've been a fan of the Cokin filters for over 20 years.

    Just my 2 cents' worth.
     

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