What is mono light?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by ultrajeeps, Jun 4, 2005.

  1. ultrajeeps

    ultrajeeps TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2004
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello,

    I would appreicate it if anyone can break this down for me. I came across PHOTOGENICS 1500 WATTS SECOND MONO LIGHT. I have only had a pleasure using NIKON's SB series flash. I would like to shoot cars and would appreciate it if anyone can explain why people use monolights?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Chase

    Chase I am now benign! Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2003
    Messages:
    7,810
    Likes Received:
    51
    Location:
    Deep in the heart of Texas!
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Monolights like this are what you'd see used in a studio setting. They are usually stand alone lights that are often combined with softboxes and umbrellas as part of an overall studio setup. Instead of being an on-camera flash, these would usually be mounted on a floor stand.

    Hope that helps!
     
  3. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Messages:
    16,728
    Likes Received:
    45
    Location:
    Where am I now?
    It is a studio flash.
    They call them monolights to seperate them from the old multi-unit lights which had a big bank of flash bulbs. It also seperates them from strip flash, fish fryers and swimming pools (basically flash units with built in soft boxes).
    1,500 Watts per sec means it is a 1k5 Joule light - a measure of the amount of power it can handle. The standard studio flash unit (eg Bowens) kicks out around 500 Joules so the one you are looking at is a biggy.
    You need to find out if it is just the light or if it includes the power pack. You need a power pack to make it work.
    If you want to shoot cars in the studio you really need a fish fryer (5kJ) or a swimming pool (25kJ) to get a soft, even light.
    The rule of thumb is: if you don't know what it is, don't buy it.
     
  4. Christie Photo

    Christie Photo No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2005
    Messages:
    7,006
    Likes Received:
    67
    Location:
    Kankakee, IL
    Well.... 'round these parts, that just what a mono light is. It's completely self-contained. The "power pack" is part of the light. The advantages of a mono light include the lack of a cord connecting it to a separate capacitor, the ability to easily control the output of the light independently without affecting the output of other lights, and the elimination of a sync cord when used with other lights by use of a built-in slave. The down-side is added cost per light. Systems with a common capacitor allow multiple lamps all connected to a single power pack, each with thier own cord, making it cheaper to add lamps.

    Either system can be used in the studio or on location, but the mono light will be less intrusive on location, requiring no more than a single cord for power.

    I hope this helps.

    -Pete
     
  5. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Messages:
    16,728
    Likes Received:
    45
    Location:
    Where am I now?
    Technically a monolight means 'single light'. They can come with an integral powerpack or without and still be called monolights. That is why I said to find out which it was.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page
mono light
,

mono lighting

,

mono lights

,
pegout206 mono light
,
what are monolights
,
what does monolight mean
,
what is a mono light
,
what is a monolight
,
what is mono light
,
what is monolight