What is sharpness?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by darkhorn, Jul 25, 2010.

  1. darkhorn

    darkhorn TPF Noob!

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    I have 3 options of sharpness in the camera: edged, mid, softened? Which option will give me the real image? I don't care about edges-softness, I care about the real image.

    Her is my cam.
     
  2. rusty9

    rusty9 TPF Noob!

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    read the manual, kid
     
  3. Gaerek

    Gaerek TPF Noob!

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    There's no such thing as the "real image." All images have been processed to some extent, and there really aren't any that look like real life. Why don't you try all three and see which gives you the results you like the best?
     
  4. darkhorn

    darkhorn TPF Noob!

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    that was the first thing that i've done kid
    the manual says
    You can select whether you want the image to have sharp or soft outlines.

    1. The Edges of the image are empahasized. The edges will become sharp, but noise may occur in the recording image.
    2. The edges of the image are sharp. This is suitable for printing.
    3. The edges of the image are softened. This is suitable for editing images on PC.


    So nothing informative. That is why I come here.
     
  5. darkhorn

    darkhorn TPF Noob!

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    Which one is less processed? Or, how the are processed?
     
  6. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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  7. Gaerek

    Gaerek TPF Noob!

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    That seems very informative. Noise is bad. In a compact camera like you have, noise is already a problem. #1 is probably not a good choice. Are you planning on processing? If not, stay away from #3. If you are, #3 would probably be ok. By processing, I mean using a program to sharpen it yourself.

    The least processed is #3. But keep in mind that no matter how good the camera is, there is inherent softness in all digital images without processing of some kind. Unless you are planning on sharpening the images yourself using some program on your computer, the second option is probably going to be your best bet.

    But I still refer you back to my original statement. Try all three out and see what you like best. It's impossible for any of us to know how the sharpening works in that camera and to give advice without images to look at.
     
  8. invisible

    invisible Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    It seems that #3 is the option that doesn't apply any in-camera sharpening. I'd go with this one, since it's the one that gives you the flexibility of sharpening during post-processing later on.

    If you rather choose options 1 or 2, there's no going back: the file is altered in camera -- which means some loss of the data recorded by the sensor, and the lost data cannot be recovered.

    Even if you're not doing much post-processing right now, you might in the future. Keeping your files with as much data as possible in them could save you valuable time later on.
     

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