What Macro Lens

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by M_Werner1, Apr 9, 2008.

  1. M_Werner1

    M_Werner1 TPF Noob!

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    So I have been thinking about investing into a macro lens for a while now. I will be using it to shoot furniture but it would be nice to double it as a portrait lens. I was looking at the Tamron 70mm I believe it is or the Canon 60mm efs. But I am not to sure about the efs incase I ever wanted to upgrade from my XTi. Any one got any advice?? Thanks
     
  2. lextalionis

    lextalionis TPF Noob!

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    When I had my XTi I went with the Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro and don't regret it a bit. I still use it today on my 30D.

    Here are some shots taken with both my 30D and XTi (you can download a higher resolution using the down arrow): http://www.motleypixel.com/reviews/index.htm?openfolder=Canon Primes/Canon EF 100mm f2.8/

    The second choice I would recommend for macro is the Sigma 105mm f/2.8 Macro (main drawback is that it trombones, a little louder with AF, and hunts a bit more than the Canon 100 in low light, BUT every bit as sharp as the Canon 100): http://www.motleypixel.com/reviews/index.htm?openfolder=Sigma Primes/Sigma 105mm f2.8 EX DG Macro/

    It's a BIG step in $$ for full frame, so for me it will be awhile. For macro and good portraits I would lastly recommend the Canon EF-S 60mm f/2.8 USM Macro: http://www.motleypixel.com/reviews/index.htm?openfolder=Canon Primes/Canon EF-S 60mm f2.8 Macro/

    Hope this helps!

    -Roy
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    How small is the furniture that you are shooting?
     
  4. frXnz kafka

    frXnz kafka TPF Noob!

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    :lmao:

    Seriously though. Do you really need a macro lens for furniture?
     
  5. M_Werner1

    M_Werner1 TPF Noob!

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    I am a cabinetmaker so I will be shooting all different sizes of furniture. I would like a macro for alot of the close ups and details of the craftsmanship. I also want to start taking more portrait shots
     
  6. Phranquey

    Phranquey TPF Noob!

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    What if it was doll furniture??


    Understandable in that aspect. Almost any focal range would work, since you don't have to worry about scaring your subject like you would with wildlife photography. If you get a shorter lens, you will just have to get closer to your work.
     
  7. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    In this case I'm inclined to mention something else. A 60mm macro will have a larger depth of field than a 105mm macro which could be a consideration when showing off such things.
     
  8. M_Werner1

    M_Werner1 TPF Noob!

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    I was considering a shorter focal length but I would like to try and double it as a portrait lens. Thanks for all the suggestions
     
  9. frXnz kafka

    frXnz kafka TPF Noob!

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    A 60mm will work just fine for portraits. Especially on your XTi, where it is effectively 96mm.
     
  10. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    As said this is an arguement for, not against.

    At 105mm I can say you need to be 6m away to take a full frame person sitting down. The 60mm is far more versatile for portraits, especially given space constraints.
     
  11. M_Werner1

    M_Werner1 TPF Noob!

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    okay thanks for the help i will stop by a shop this weekend when i go to london and take a look at the lens. thanks for the help
     
  12. gryphonslair99

    gryphonslair99 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    If you are not sure that you really want to get into macro then I would suggest a different track. Get the nifty fifty (fomm f1.8) for under $100 and a set of extension tubes. The Kenko's are nice and only about $150.

    Extension tubes have no glass, they are just that, extension tubes. They allow you to use a standard lens for closeup/macro photography. If you would rather have something a little more in the portrait range, then you could also look at 85 f1.8. Real nice portrait lens.

    Besides, if you find you don't want to do macro you can always sell the tubes are recover most of you money. If they are well taken care of and since they have no glass they will not depreciate much.

    I would suggest the 50mm though unless you shop is larger than mine. I have a 25 X 45 foot wood shop and anything more than 50mm and I don't have enought room to get the shot of stuff I have finisehd in my build space.
     

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