What should I have done?

Discussion in 'Critique Forum Archives' started by JenR, Jan 15, 2007.

  1. JenR

    JenR TPF Noob!

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    My husband and daughter had a little quiet time together on our porch. I KNOW there was a great photo that wanted to be taken, but I couldn't catch it with my beginner skills. So, for future reference... What should I have done differently? I have a D50 and a 28 - 80 mm lens. Thanks to all!

    Here is one of the originals...
    [​IMG]



    It looks a little better once I cropped it, but the background is still very busy.
    [​IMG]

    How can I improve? I really want to improve, so feel free to let me have it.
     
  2. Sw1tchFX

    Sw1tchFX TPF Noob!

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    You should have hid and made it a candid in my opinion.
     
  3. Tyson

    Tyson TPF Noob!

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    Flash? I am not sure it looks ok. A little dark.
     
  4. theRossatron

    theRossatron TPF Noob!

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    I would agree with Switch - and perhaps choose a larger aperture to get a shallow depth of field if you find the background too busy.
     
  5. rwebbart

    rwebbart TPF Noob!

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    I would have shot at 2.8 or 3.5 to let the background fall out of focus, and used a fill flash.

    Don't think you can't use flash outside. A lot of beginners never even think of it, but at mid day, in shade, or anytime for that matter.

    If you are not sure about the manual settings or numbers we have thrown out, then try this........

    Switch to Aperture Priority mode, (AV on Canon, not sure about Nikon) and roll the little wheel in front of the shutter button until it gets to the lowest Aperture number for your lens. I think it is 3.5 on your's. (that lowest number is the largest aperture opening letting in more light)

    I don't know how beginner you are, so sorry if the info was to remedial.
     
  6. Emma-Lee

    Emma-Lee TPF Noob!

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    hope you don't mind, I thought it was a lovely photo and agree with what everyone said about things you could have done to achieve more brightness. But when all else fails a little photoshop doesn't hurt...

    [​IMG]

    I just played around with a 2 'o clock spotlight.
     
  7. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    It's a little underexposed...probably because the bright white fence behind them is causing the camera's meter to give you less exposure. You could have added positive exposure compensation or used some fill flash (Av mode with negative Flash Exposure Compensation).
     
  8. RMThompson

    RMThompson the TPF moderators rock my world!

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    I agree about it being too posed. Candid would've been better. Remember candid shots are easier for the eye to forgive mistakes like under or over exposure. When you are doing a "planned" shot, it's up to you to make sure lighting and composition is correct.

    I did an edit too, but I can't attach it from work. Basically though, I cut out the husband altogether, and focused on the beautiful eyes of the little girl. Nothing against him, but my eyes keep being drawn to hers, because of her unique angle and she is close to the "rule of 3" line...

    In fact the Rule of Three is part of your problem here. The Rule of Three line is RIGHT where the fence is intersecting the photo from the top, and add to that the bright whiteness of it, it draws me eye there FIRST, and then down to the girls eye. His statuesque look doesn't do anything to the photo, and in fact adds to the "snapshot" quality. That's not a good thing in this case.
     
  9. JenR

    JenR TPF Noob!

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    Thank you all for the comments and photo edits. I agree that a truly candid shot would have been better. Unfortunately for me, as soon as my daughter sees the camera she will start "posing" and really hamming it up. I just happened to catch the split second between acts. I wish there had been a way for me to shoot them without them even knowing I was there, but it didn't really work out that way.

    ~jen
     
  10. newrmdmike

    newrmdmike TPF Noob!

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    somthing like this might benifit from the highlights/shadows function in photoshop. it will act as a digital fill flash for you.
     
  11. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    omg. PS is going to be the death of actual photo technique. This isn't a point and shoot, it's a proper SLR. I am astounded that no one (except mike) mentioned exposure compensation. Not only is it straight out of photography 101, but it's in the manual for every camera I have ever seen (seriously, look it up. Perhaps it's under "backlighting" in the index).

    I'm sorry if I sound like a jerk here, but I have to disagree with just about everyone. Jen (if I may call you by your first name). Yes, the photo can be rescued to some extent by PS. But the question was "what should you have done?" The answer, plain and simple, is exposure compensation. A bounce flash may have helped to some extent, but it would need to be pretty powerful.
     
  12. rwebbart

    rwebbart TPF Noob!

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    Chill out and read the first 3 or 4 replies to her question and you will see that NO ONE suggested PhotoShop. I didn't mention exposure compensation, but I did explain Aperture Settings and Fill Flash quite a bit.
     

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