What was the one photography tip you learned after which you no longer felt like a beginner?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by textures4photoshop, Dec 20, 2017.

  1. textures4photoshop

    textures4photoshop TPF Noob!

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    A pro photographer told me that going out and shooting is the best photography class you can take


     
  2. dunfly

    dunfly No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    When you read a pro tip and think to yourself "well, heck, everyone knows that" and then read the comments and realize that "well, everyone doesn't know that".
     
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  3. Gary A.

    Gary A. Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Yes those are mine. I used to be a news photog during the film only days. Those old B&W's were all shot with Tri-X and various Nikons: F, FTn, FM, F2, F3 and an occasional photo with a Hasselblad.
     
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  4. textures4photoshop

    textures4photoshop TPF Noob!

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    you really hit the nail on the head there! while documenting for my article I did touch upon explaining ISO and how a higher ISO means more noise in the picture. That really started a debate between photographers and as it turns out, it's not as simple as that, and sometimes a higher ISO can actually mean less noise
     
  5. Gary A.

    Gary A. Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Yes. I tell beginning photographers to:

    1) Shoot;
    2) Shoot some more; and at the end of the day when you think you're finished,
    3) Shoot again.
     
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  6. Gary A.

    Gary A. Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Shooting a ton needs to be tempered with savage self-critiquing. You have to be hard on yourself, lean heavily on the delete key, you can always do better. No one cares, except maybe your mother, what you went through to capture the image ... the only thing that matters is the final image.
     
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  7. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Thanks, and we appreciate your understanding. You are however welcome to post the entire article in the "Articles of Interest" forum if you'd like.
     
  8. textures4photoshop

    textures4photoshop TPF Noob!

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    That's super! I've only shot film using a Smena 8M and a Ricoh KR-10 which I bought 2 months ago. For BW I used the Fomapan, but I will for sure give the Tri-X a try

    I can really tell from your photos that you know what you're doing. I would appreciate it a lot if you can take a look at the article in my signature and get your hones feedback regarding information accuracy and completeness (I know I can never be complete with such a vast domain)

    thank you so much
     
  9. weepete

    weepete TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    I think the biggest ting for me was framing. Pay attention to the edges and allow a bit of space around the subject!
     
  10. Gary A.

    Gary A. Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    The problem with photography is one tends to speak in generalities and ignore all the exceptions. I haven't read the article, yet ... but I find I have to provide alot of thought to qualifying what I post.

    Please post your article.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2017
  11. Gary A.

    Gary A. Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    If that space is for cropping, I come from a different school. In my prime, I shot full-frame ... as in ... no cropping. If the horizon was crooked or something skewed/needed cropping, I would dump the shot. I am trying to get back to that level of framing.
     
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  12. weepete

    weepete TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Not for cropping mate, but it's about creating a deliberate composition in the frame particularly with landscape shots. If, for example, you have a shot with a big rock in the foreground that's being used as an anchor point cutting off the bottom of the rock makes the shot look careless, just giving it a little room and showing the bottom of it gives the entire image a more considered look. Same with buildings, if you include a couple of edges at the side of the frame rather than cut half way through a building it really does make the whole composition look more deliberate.

    Admitedly as a photographer you need to decide where the edges lie, and invariably something will be cut off, but making it have minimal impact on the scene is the key.
     

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