What Watt Seconds should Fill Lights have for Product Photography?

Discussion in 'Lighting and Hardware' started by orbit6781, Nov 29, 2017.

  1. orbit6781

    orbit6781 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2017
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    What Watt Seconds should fill lights have for product photography?

    I get confused because some of what I have read is for portrait photography. My question is on product photography.

    I also get confused most books talk about the Ws for main lights, not fill lights.

    Should one purchase fill lights with at least 600 Ws? Or at least 1000 Ws? Or at least 300 Ws?

    The photography will be taking place indoors in a studio.

    Thank you.


     
  2. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Top Poster Of Month

    Joined:
    May 4, 2006
    Messages:
    4,017
    Likes Received:
    494
    Welcome to the forum.

    It deppends on your distance from your subject. And how much your spreading the light (size of light modifiers). Small items you can get away with 150ws easily. Many people have 300ws lights. Busy pro will have the stronger lights.

    My newer main lights are 600ws, and my fill lights are 150ws. 2 monolights of each power.

    Have a look at strobist.com. Lots of information on their site for flash and lighting.
     
  3. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    40,023
    Likes Received:
    15,009
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    There is no set Watt-second rating level for fill, or for main light output. Many people use a fill light that is say 1/4th of the rating of the main light, so if you had 600 Watt-seconds as a main light, a common fill light output could be 150 Watt-seconds...or a little more, or a little less, depending on the lighting ratio desired. I've shot a lot with a 400 W-s main and 100 W-s fill light and a 25 Watt-second hair light. Or 200/50/12.5.
     
  4. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2012
    Messages:
    16,070
    Likes Received:
    4,021
    Location:
    Iowa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    There is no set formula for any of this. The photographer sets the power of the lights as required.

    There is one fundamental difference between product photography and portraiture; in product photography, the subjects (typically) do not move, fidget, look the wrong way, sneeze, cough, blink, or forget what pose they are in. Therefore; product photographers can use a longer shutter speed and perhaps less light.

    The settings for fill lights will depend on what setting you have made for the main lights. You will generally want some ratio of power starting with your main light and (typically) reducing your fill lights to some percentage of the main light(s).

    The power you will need will depend (typically) on how big is your subject, and how far away are the lights. The distance to your camera is not important, just the lights. Without more information on what objects you are photographing, it is going to be simply blind guesswork to name a power level.
     
  5. FotosbyMike

    FotosbyMike No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2015
    Messages:
    254
    Likes Received:
    75
    Location:
    Charlotte, NC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I would also second most of the above, and say buy as most power for all lights then adjust as needed. Because when you start diffusing the lights, using polarizing film, grids...etc. you will start losing stops of light quickly then add your DOF/F-stop/Aperture you will need more light the small F-stop you go.

    Plus if you plan on shooting macro you will need a lot of light due to the f-stop needed to get the product in focus.
     
  6. 480sparky

    480sparky Chief Free Electron Relocator Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    Messages:
    22,547
    Likes Received:
    8,088
    Location:
    Iowa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    There is no one, single answer to this. We just can't say, "Oh, 200ws."

    It all depends on:

    1. The lighting output you're using for other lighting.
    2. What lighting ratio you desire in relationship to #1.

    If you're pumping 600ws from your main lights, and you want a 2:1 ratio for your fill, then you'll need 300ws. If you only have 300ws in your mains, you'll only need 150ws for the fill. But that's only if you want 2:1. If you want 3:1 or 4:1 or 1.5:1, you'll need totally different outputs.

    How much power you're using for you main lights depends greatly on what the product is you're shooting. It's gonna take a lot more power to light up, say, a sports car in a warehouse than it is a wrist watch on a table.
     
  7. orbit6781

    orbit6781 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2017
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Hi, thank you for all of the replies. I plan on photographing packaged food products that you find in a grocery store. The items range from boxed products such as nutrition bars to fresh fruit and vegetables to bottled products such as juice. The photography will taken very close to the products.

    The main light is a Paul C Buff White Lightning X3200. It has 1320 Ws. A softbox will be attached to it.

    The fill light is a Paul C Buff Einstein. It has 640 Ws. It has less than half the Ws of the X3200.

    Do you think the setup above is a good one for product photography for food products?

    Also I want a sharp depth of field. Do you think the above setup will be able to accomplish that?

    Thank you.
     
  8. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    40,023
    Likes Received:
    15,009
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit


    PLENTY of power! You might very well end up dialing the WL 3200 down to 1/4 power, and the Einstein to 1/8 or even 1/16 power, and getting great shots.

    LOADS of flash power in both monolights.
     

Share This Page