What would you buy? Calling Nikon Users.

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Patrick, Aug 31, 2005.

?

Which?

  1. Nikon N80

    5 vote(s)
    50.0%
  2. Nikon N90

    5 vote(s)
    50.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Patrick

    Patrick TPF Noob!

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    Can't make up my mind...

    New or gently used Nikon N80
    Like new N90
     
  2. hobbes28

    hobbes28 Incredible Supporting Member

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    Price difference?
     
  3. Patrick

    Patrick TPF Noob!

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    Going used and used just about the same...
     
  4. hobbes28

    hobbes28 Incredible Supporting Member

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    I don't even see the specs for the N90...hmmm
     
  5. Patrick

    Patrick TPF Noob!

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  6. Patrick

    Patrick TPF Noob!

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    Specifications N90


    • Type of camera Integral-motor autofocus 35mm single-lens reflex Picture format 24mm x 36mm (standard 35mm film format)
    • Lens mount Nikon F mount
    • Lens Nikkor and Nikon lenses having Nikon F mount with some limitations;
    • Focus modes Autofocus, and Manual with Electronic Rangefinder Autofocus area Wide and Spot selectable
    • autofocus mode Single Servo AF with Focus-Priority and Continuous Servo AF with Release-Priority
    • Focus Tracking Automatically activated when subject moves
    • Autofocus detection system Nikon CAM246 autofocus module
    • Autofocus detection range Approx. EV -1 to EV 19 (at ISO 100)
    • Autofocus lock Possible once stationary subject is in focus in Single Servo AF; in Continuous Servo AF, focus can be locked with AF-L
    • (autofocus lock) button
    • Electronic rangefinder Available in Manual focus mode with AF
    • Nikkor or other Al-type Nikkor lens with a maximum aperture of f/5.6 or faster
    • Exposure metering Three built-in exposure meters—Matrix, Centre
    • Weighted and Spot Metering range (at ISO 100 with f/lA lens) EV -1 to EV 21 for
    • Matrix and Centre-Weighted metering; EV 3 to EV 21 for Spot meter Exposure meter Activated by lightly pressing shutter release button; stays on for 8 sec., after finger leaves button
    • Exposure modes Programmed Auto (Auto-Multi Program and Vari Program), Shutter-Priority Auto, Aperture-Priority Auto and Manual Programmed Auto exposure control Camera sets both shutter speed and lens aperture automatically; Flexible Program possible in increments of 1/3 EV for shutter speed or of EV for aperture setting
    • Shutter-Priority Auto exposure control Aperture automatically selected to match manually set shutter speed; shutter speed can be set in 1/3 EV steps
    • Aperture-Priority Auto exposure control Shutter speed automatically, selected to match manually set aperture
    • Manual exposure control Both aperture and shutter speed are set manually; shutter speed can be set in 1/3 EV steps
    • Vari-Program Seven kinds built in: Portrait Program, Portrait Program with Red-Eye Reduction, Hyperfocal Program, Landscape Program,
    • Silhouette Program, Sport Program, and Close-up Program; each has its own program line, and specific camera settings such as metering system, focus area, etc., are automatically selected
    • Exposure compensation With exposure compensation button; +5 EV range, in 1/3 EV steps
    • Auto exposure lock By sliding AE lock lever while meter is on
    • Shutter Electro magnetically controlled vertical-travel focal-plane shun Shutter release By motor trigger
    • Shutter speeds Lithium oscillator-controlled speeds from 1/8000 to 30 sec. in 1/3 EV steps; electro-magnetically controlled Bulb setting is provided
    • Viewfinder Fixed eye-level pentaprism high-eyepoint type; 0.78x magnification with 50mm lens set at infinity; approx. 92% frame coverage
    • Eyepoint Approx. 19mm
    • Eyepiece shutter Provided
    • Focusing screen Nikon advanced B-type BriteView screen; interchangeable with E-type screen
    • Viewfinder information Focus area, focus indications, exposure mode, shutter speed, second mark for shutter speed slower than one second, aperture, electronic analogue display, frame counter/exposure compensation value/Vari-Program, Flexible Program mark and exposure compensation mark are all shown in LCD readout; also shows flash recommend c.d./ready light LED
    • LCD panel information shutter speed, aperture, exposure mode, metering system, focus area, autofocus mark with focus-release-priority indication, Flexible Program mark, flash sync, film speed, DX mark, exposure compensation mark, frame counter/Vari-Program/ exposure compensation value, Custom mark, film advance mode, film loading, film rewind, self-timer, battery power
    • Viewfinder/LCD panel illumination Viewfinder and LCD panel illuminated by pressing button
    • Film speed range ISO 25 to 5000 for DX-coded film; ISO 6 to 6400 can be manually set
    • Film speed setting At DX position, automatically set to ISO speed of DX-coded film used; manual setting possible
    • Film loading Film automatically advances to first frame when shutter release button is depressed once
    • Film advance In single-frame shooting mode, film automatically advances one frame when shutter is released; m CH (continuous high) or 9 C L (continuous low) shooting mode, shots are taken as long as shutter release button is depressed; in CH mode, shooting speed is approx. 4.3 fps, and in I L approx. 2.0 fps; in Focus Tracking, shooting speed is approx. 4.1 fps
      [*]Frame counter Additive type; counts back while film is being rewound
      [*]Self-timer Electronically controlled; duration selectable from 2 to 30 seconds in one-sec. increments; LED indicates self-timer operation; cancellable
      [*]Depth of-field preview button Provides visual verification of depth of field; can be previewed in Aperture-Priority Auto or Manual exposure mode
      [*]Reflex mirror Automatic, instant-return type
      [*]Camera back Hinged back; interchangeable with Nikon Multi-Control Back MF-26 or World Time Data Back MF-25
      [*]Accessory shoe Standard ISO-type hot-shoe contact; ready-light contact, TTL flash contact, monitor contact; Mount receptacle for SB-26's or SB-27's Posi-Mount System is provided
      [*]Flash sync control Slow Sync, Rear curtain Sync and Red-Eye
      [*]Reduction functions built-in
      [*]Flash synchronisation In Programmed Auto or Aperture-Priority Auto, shutter operates from 1/250 to 1/60 sec. in normal sync or 1/250 to 30 sec. in slow sync; in Shutter-Priority Auto or Manual exposure mode, shutter frees at speed set, and when set from 1/250 to 1/8000 sec., shutter is automatically set to 1/250 sec.
      [*]TTL Multi Sensor Five-segment bulb sensor used for TTL auto flash control Automatic Balanced fill-Flash with TTL Multi Sensor Possible when AF or Al-P Nikkor lens is used with Nikon Speedlite SB-26, SB-27, SB-23, etc.
      [*]Monitor Pre-flash Nikon Speedlite SB-26 or SB-27 fires Monitor Pre flash(es) for TTL Multi Sensor when AF or Al-P Nikkor lens is used
      [*]Flash recommended/ready light No Speedlite attached: Lights up in green when flash is recommended Speedlite attached: Lights up in red when Nikon dedicated Speedlite is ready to fire, or blinks to warn of insufficient light for correct exposure
      [*]Power source Four AA-type alkaline, Ni-Cd, manganese or lithium batteries; two CR123A-type lithium batteries also usable for Bulb-Power
      [*]Vertical Grip MB-IO with MS-I I battery holder attached * ML-3 cannot be used when AA-type lithium batteries are used
      [*]Battery power confirmation for sufficient power; 1 indicates batteries are nearing exhaustion; blinking Cl indicates batteries are just about exhausted; no indication/mark appears when batteries are completely exhausted or improperly installed
      [*]
      Dimensions (W x H x D) Approx. 154 x 106 x 69mm

      Weight (without batteries) Approx. 755g

     
  7. thebeginning

    thebeginning TPF Noob!

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    n90 definitely. besides, if it's the same price and in better condition, why not buy the newer, better model?? or am i wrong and the n80 is newer...i didnt think so. i remember reading that the n90 and the n90s are pretty dang nice cameras, esp. for the price. i'd go for it.
     
  8. Patrick

    Patrick TPF Noob!

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    Well the N90 isn't the new model.. As far as I can tell the N90 isn't being made anymore. My thought was the N90 would be a better build quality than the N80. The N80 would be in just a tad better condition. Course there's a few years age difference too.
     
  9. kfoster

    kfoster TPF Noob!

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    I personally own a N90s. Great camera. Even though its hard to tell the differences between the N90 and N90s, the N90s has better metering. The vertical shutter release on the battery pack (MB-10, which is used on both cameras) only works on the N90s.

    The N90 and N90s have stronger bodies then the N80. The N80 is more of a consumer camera, while the N90(s) are used by many pros as backups.

    One big difference between the newer N80 and the older N90(s) is that the N80 is fully compatable with newer "G" lenses and lenses with Vibration Reduction. The N90(s) can use "G" lenses but only shutter priority and auto modes, and VR will not work at all.

    I believe the N80 also has an improved matrix metering system similar to that of the D70 and F100.

    K
     
  10. ajmall

    ajmall TPF Noob!

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    I've heard great things about the 90 but never used it. I used an F80 (N80) for nearly 2 years and to this day still think it's one of the best non-pro ergonomically designed cameras around. With the battery grip it fits so snuggly into your hand.

    To this day i would probably still go with the N80 as the technology is better even if it's not a pro body like the 90.
     
  11. KevinR

    KevinR TPF Noob!

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    I have a N90 and love the camera. Nikon replaced the N90 with the F100.
     
  12. Patrick

    Patrick TPF Noob!

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    Think I'm going for the N90s.
    A big thank-you to those who responded. ;)
     

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