whats all this hes got on his camera?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by iPhoto17, Nov 4, 2009.

  1. iPhoto17

    iPhoto17 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2009
    Messages:
    637
    Likes Received:
    27
    Location:
    cornelius, NC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    a photographer came in the other night to take pictures of my dad working on his train set he does every for susan g komen foundation, so i took a couple pictures of him taking pictures, so i was wondering what he had on his camera, all i know is that its a nikon D90, with a flash ontop of some red thing (is that a thing to help focus when you use autofocus?) he also showed me a few things with my d3000, and i took a peek into his bag, he had a d60 body a tripod some color square things and a bunch of lenses[​IMG][​IMG]
     
  2. iPhoto17

    iPhoto17 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2009
    Messages:
    637
    Likes Received:
    27
    Location:
    cornelius, NC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    hes even got rubber handles on the sides of the display, i guess the camera is heavy with all that equipment on it
     
  3. fokker

    fokker No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2009
    Messages:
    2,830
    Likes Received:
    293
    Location:
    New Zealand
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Colour square things will be filters

    The flash appears to mounted on a bracket, the point of which is to move it away from the main axis of the lens to give a bit more depth and subtlety to the lighting. the red light on the flash is the AF assist light.
     
  4. iPhoto17

    iPhoto17 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2009
    Messages:
    637
    Likes Received:
    27
    Location:
    cornelius, NC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    thats what i thought about the red light, he showed me how to turn off that bright spotlight on my d3000 thats used for the autofocus assist, so does the red light work better or its just not as noticeable than the one that comes on the camera?

    how does the filter work? i saw him put a clear one up to the lense, but it was really a distorted white-ish clear
     
  5. iPhoto17

    iPhoto17 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2009
    Messages:
    637
    Likes Received:
    27
    Location:
    cornelius, NC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    thats what i thought about the red light, he showed me how to turn off that bright spotlight on my d3000 thats used for the autofocus assist, so does the red light work better or its just not as noticeable than the one that comes on the camera?

    how does the filter work? i saw him put a clear one up to the lense, but it was really a distorted white-ish clear, heres a picture of him with the camera and his wife holding it up to the lense[​IMG]
     
  6. Sinister_kid

    Sinister_kid TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2008
    Messages:
    215
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    In The City
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Looks like a kit lens in the first picture.
     
  7. musicaleCA

    musicaleCA TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 23, 2009
    Messages:
    2,303
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Sounds more like Munsell colour cards to me. Filters should be, er, round. Unless we're talking about flash gels (which would be pieces of plastic).

    That clearish thing, I'm guessing, is used to set white balance. I've seen other photographers use similar devices. Personally I don't see the point, as I want to WB for the reflected light coming from my subject, not a mush of the light that's in the room.

    The red light from the flash works better because it won't trigger blinking, for starters. Blinks are bad enough with ETTL/iTTL pre-flashes, so using a stroboscopic flash to assist AF can compound the issue. That, and the red lights coming from the flash are actually arrayed in a grid pattern, which makes them optimal for the AF sensor to focus on.

    Also, flash brackets let you keep the flash easily above the optical axis when turning the camera to a vertical position.
     

Share This Page