Whats in There?

Discussion in 'Landscape & Cityscape' started by gman172, Mar 18, 2008.

  1. gman172

    gman172 TPF Noob!

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    an odd little brick building (ive posted a bw version too) - it was taken on a small boating club nr oldham, uk

    i got a load of pretty decent pics here

    lots of the place seem derelict and unused but the door was still locked!!

    what is in there?!

    my own critism is that whenever i take pics of something with the sky behind it just blows out - is this ok/normal and whats the best fix?

    i usually do a lot of hdr which saves this happening and gives me a quick fix

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. bill04

    bill04 TPF Noob!

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    A bit over processed in the sky (maybe too much contrast in the foreground?)

    When something blows out, there is no data there, the sensor was simply exposed to too much light. In post processing, you can clone a patch (if it is sky), or take a creative approach (black and white?)

    When you shoot, you can use a tripod and take a bracketed (same picture with different exposures, one for the sky to be perfect, and the other for the ground to be perfect but the sky blown). then you load it into photoshop, open the one with the perfect sky (for example), then add a layer and load in the one with the perfect foreground. Then, using the delete tool, delete the foreground... the view will be the same in both pictures, so the POV won't change and it will look natural.

    Layer 1:
    perfect sky
    Layer 2:
    perfect ground

    You can also use a polarizer, or N. Density filter for actual shooting. If the foreground is SLIGHTY underexposed, you can recover the data. If its blown, you cant. If I had to chose I would let the sky be exposed well and fix the foreground in post processing.
     

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