What's the purpose of a Neutral Density filter that underexposing can't do?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by rasheemo, Aug 1, 2008.

  1. rasheemo

    rasheemo TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2008
    Messages:
    162
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Wayne, NJ
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    i'm not referring to gradual ND filters, i understand the uses of those. but constant ND filters. what's the point of them? can't you just underexpose the shot or something?
     
  2. nynfortoo

    nynfortoo TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 4, 2008
    Messages:
    352
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Chester, UK
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    They allow you to use longer shutter speeds than you'd be able to use without an ND filter. This can be useful for adding motion to a shot in daylight.
     
  3. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    Messages:
    14,491
    Likes Received:
    206
    Location:
    Europe 67.51°N
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    they also allow wider apertures. it can be hard to get a very shallow depth of field in very bright sunlight if you are already at the shortest shutter speed, it can be impossible to use f/1.4.

    the ND solves this problem.

    BTW, none of my ND filter shots is underexposed ;) this is not what they are for.
     
  4. rasheemo

    rasheemo TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2008
    Messages:
    162
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Wayne, NJ
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    is that it? so basically if i wanted a blur shot in bright light and narrowing the aperture doesnt yield a 5 second exposure time then i should use an ND? -_-

    EDIT: oh ok, so basically for depth of field stuff. gotcha
     
  5. nynfortoo

    nynfortoo TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 4, 2008
    Messages:
    352
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Chester, UK
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Basically, it's for any situation where you want less light entering the camera, so you can keep that wide aperture or slow shutter speed without overexposing.
     
  6. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    Messages:
    14,491
    Likes Received:
    206
    Location:
    Europe 67.51°N
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    depth of field AND long shutter speeds.

    whenever it is too bright.


    there are special applications when you do industrial photography and have very bright melts or flames, then you often need a strong ND to take any image at all-.
     
  7. rasheemo

    rasheemo TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2008
    Messages:
    162
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Wayne, NJ
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    oh i see, i guess i assumed that many pros use them and was wondering why. Ok on to graduated ND filters, i understand they rock for sunset/landscapes with bright skies, but how expensive are they relative to circular polarizers?
     
  8. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    Messages:
    14,491
    Likes Received:
    206
    Location:
    Europe 67.51°N
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    it really depends on what companies you get them from.

    they are usually cheaper than good polarizers (a good polarizer is often beyond 100 USD).

    I would go for rectangular filters which you can shift to adjust the gradient to the scene you want to capture.

    Cokin does some less expensive ones, Lee is a bit more expensive. I just got my Lee-filters, but had no chance yet to use them really.
     
  9. Resin42

    Resin42 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2008
    Messages:
    376
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Glasgow, Scotland
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I'm about to commit a sacrilige. I picked up my ND for about £8 on ebay.

    I know everyone says never skimp in any glass you're putting in front of your lens but I'm skint and really wanted to try some waterfall shots, plus I'm thinking of upgrading my lens shortly so didn't want to spend a fortune. It's given me an idea of what I can achieve and as far as I can tell hasn't been detrimental to my shots so I'll plod away with it until it starts to let me down.
     
  10. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    Messages:
    14,491
    Likes Received:
    206
    Location:
    Europe 67.51°N
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    fair enough!
     
  11. elemental

    elemental TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2008
    Messages:
    646
    Likes Received:
    3
    One more note on polarizers and neutral density filters: A polarizer reduces the light entering your lens just like a neutral density filter, and can be used for that purpose in a pinch/if you're cheap with the added benefit of pulling down really bright skies. I use a polarizer for most of my daytime shooting, especially since my 35mm camera's max shutter speed is 1/2000, which tends to result in some pretty small apertures.

    Oh, and I got my polarizers for free and they haven't ruined anything yet. You'll be fine for now.
     
  12. rasheemo

    rasheemo TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2008
    Messages:
    162
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Wayne, NJ
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    oh that sounds great.

    so one final question for you guys :D

    i'm getting a circular polarizer, and will PROBABLY get a heliopan OR a B + W CP filter, however i'm curious about tiffen's quality in comparison.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

nd filter or underexpose

,
nd filters for underexposing background
,
underexpose or use nd filter
,
underexpose vs nd filter
,
underexposing filter
,
underexposing vs gd filter
,
underexposure vs nd filter
,
whats the point of a neutral density filter?
,
why need nd filter vs underexpose
,
why neutral density filter when can underexpose