which 70-200 for night skiing photography

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by jvgig, Dec 1, 2008.

  1. jvgig

    jvgig TPF Noob!

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    As the title says, which 70-200mm canon compatible lens will be best for night skiing photography? I will be shooting at 6fps and panning to follow the skiers. I will not be using any flashes or extra lighting.

    The slopes are fairly well lit for a ski slope, but I will still need a fast shutter. I really do not want to spend much over $1000, so unless I find some incredible deal, the 2.8 IS is out. I am not too concerned about the size difference between the 2.8 and 4 as long as the extra size can be justified with the extra stop. Would I benefit more from the IS or from the extra stop? I could easily stick it on a monopod without much inconvenience and I very well may to make panning easier. I am not committed to Canon but will need a good reason to consider something else. I will be using a canon 40d.

    Thanks
     
  2. Bryant

    Bryant TPF Noob!

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    I'd definitely recommend the 2.8, you will definitely need the extra stop even though it's a well lit slope. The way it looks to you without the camera is not what it will look like on the camera. I would definitely suggest a flash if you're not willing to pay up for the Canon 70-200mm f/2.8, as you can freeze the motion, although you wouldn't be able to max out your 40d. DEFINITELY get a monopod, tripod if necessary, as you won't be able to pan great.
     
  3. Bryant

    Bryant TPF Noob!

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    And by the way, you won't be able to reach your 6fps because of the lighting already, i'm guessing you'd only be able to go at 1/200, probably even slower, not allowing for the necessary time for your camera.
     
  4. jvgig

    jvgig TPF Noob!

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    I personally will not be using the camera most of the time as I want shots of my own skiing, much of which will be either on public slopes or a race course. In the first case, I would not want to distract others with the flash and in the second, I do not want flashes going off as I am navigating gates. With that in mind, I may be forced to go with the 2.8 as you say. If I put the camera on a monopod, would I even benefit from IS?
     
  5. 250Gimp

    250Gimp TPF Noob!

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    You may want to consider the Sigma 70-200 f2.8. It is under a grand new.

    I don't have direct experience with it, but it supposed to be a pretty good lense.

    Others on here who have it should pipe in.

    Cheers
     
  6. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Unless your shutter speed drops below 1/6 (or so) you will still be able to shoot at 6fps. At 1/200, there is plenty of time to shoot at 6 fps.

    The 'best' 70-200 lens is the 2.8 L IS...but that's out of the budget. For something like this, you could probably skip the IS, and get the 2.8 (non IS)...which is currently $1045 at B&H.

    As mentioned, you might also consider the Sigma and I believe that Tamron also has a new 70-200mm F2.8 lens. I'm not sure how fast the AF is on those lenses...that would be something to look into. The Canon models have decently fast AF response, especially on a camera with good AF.
     
  7. Kegger

    Kegger TPF Noob!

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    The Sigma is very good and the AF is nice and quick. Haven't had any issues with hunting in low-light.
     
  8. JerryPH

    JerryPH No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Unfortunately, the Sigma stigma of a few "bad ones" leaving the factory is following around the new 70-200 F/2.8 lens.

    A guy from the Flickr D700 forum ordered one, and sent it back, and ordered a Nikkor, but there is another user there that is getting some REALLY nice results with his Sigma even at F/2.8. They were extreme softness issues at F/2.8 (I mean some TERRIBLE soft pics at that aperture!), and by F/4 things were drastically better.

    Before you buy anywhere, ask about possible return policies and just be aware that this is a possibility... I do not know how remote or anything, just that it is possible. :)
     
  9. Kegger

    Kegger TPF Noob!

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    You mean this one Jerry? Sigma can put out some good stuff.

    [​IMG]

    Wide open, 200mm, handheld.
     

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