Which do I get?

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by Jassue, Jun 14, 2006.

  1. Jassue

    Jassue TPF Noob!

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    Hi all,

    I've used a regular point and shoot digital camera all this time and have decided I want to get involved in more serious photography.

    I'm intrigued with infrared photography, I enjoy macro and long shots. I definitely want a cam with a minimum of a 8x optical zoom. I have a list of cams that I am considering and would love your input on which one I should get based on the above.

    1. Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ20 or FZ30
    2. Panasonic LUMIX DMC-FZ7 or FZ5
    3. Nikon Coolpix 8700 or 5700
    4. Canon PowerShot S2 IS
    5. Sony DSC-H1 or H2 or H3

    I don't mind suggestions on discontinued models, I think I would be able to track them down on eBay. What IR filters would you recommend for the Panasonic cams, and the others too? I've read up on the IR test (pointing a TV remote at the cam), but have no idea which IR filters would be perfect for the cams mentioned above.

    I appreciateany advice and thank you all in advance.

     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Welcome to the forum.

    I would consider all of those cameras to be point & shoot. Have a look at the Nikon D50 or Canon Rebel XT.
     
  3. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    I don't think "point and shoot" applies to many modern cameras. There used to be a lot of cameras where that's all you could do. They had a single aperture, a 35mm lens, and shutter was automatic. If full auto is considered p&s, then a DLSR is a p&s too. Just because a camera has a removable lens doesn't make it leaps and bounds above other cameras. It gives you more options, but you pay for that.
     
  4. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I think that "point & shoot" is a bad term...and I probably shouldn't group all non-DSLR digital cameras into that group.

    They all have small sensors though...and that, to me, is the biggest difference between them and a DLSR. A removable lens is by no means a measure of quality...but it is surely more versatile to be able to change the lens. Also, lenses are a decent investment compared to any modern digital camera with an attached lens.

    I find it funny when I see that "beginner" cameras now cost hundreds of dollars. 15 years ago, a decent 35mm non-SLR camera might cost $50-$100....and a pretty good SLR was $400. The camera companies must be laughing at us from behind their piles of money.
     
  5. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    Oh I know. It's crazy. And it is nice to have money in glass and not just a body that's going to be outdated. You bring up a good point about sensor size, but there's still a big cost difference. It usually takes someone a bit of time to get into the swing of things. I know someone who was taking beautiful images after only two years, but she was retired and put a lot of hours into it. For most people, I would guess that they wouldn't need anything special for a while.

    Everyone likes to have wide open possibilities with no limits, but that's really expensive, especially with digital. I'm just thinking that it's more of a psychological factor than any real limit for most people getting into photography, but it's not new to digital. There's a reason why people who have been into photography for a while often suggest a 50mm/f1.8 as a starting lens before getting a zoom or snazzy telephoto, but it's really hard for someone starting out to see the logic in that.
     
  6. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep TPF Noob!

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    I have the 8700 and am happy with it except for 1 thing. Its slow. Fairly long shutter lag. Not good for high speed action shots (at max resolution). It is quicker at lower resolutions. Everything else I am very happy with it. As far as I know, shutter lag is common in most P&S and the prosumer digi cams you listed.

    I also have a Nikon D50 and Canon 20D. Either one would also be very good starter cameras. Just a bit more expensive due to needing lenses.

    Even though I have the DSLRs I still use the 8700 when I want something small to carry with me. Very good for hiking where weight is an issue.
     
  7. tehbuffalo

    tehbuffalo TPF Noob!

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    Okay. I have an Olympus SP-500UZ and it's got full manual controls, 23 preset settings for different types of shots, except if your going with Big Mike then it's a point and shoot.

    See, I really really hate that. Point and shoot. Don't you do that with all cameras? Ugh. So yeah it just dosn't have a removable lense. But it has 10x optical zoom and 50x digital zoom. I took a picture of a plane and I got the logo in detail.

    Jake
     

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