Which filter???

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Marco120588, Oct 6, 2003.

  1. Marco120588

    Marco120588 TPF Noob!

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    I want a filter that would be great for photographing heavily make-up'd woman. I want great contrast as well as good flesh tones. What filter or filters should I use for this?
     
  2. oriecat

    oriecat work in progress

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    Why do you think you need a filter? What do you want it to do?
     
  3. SC

    SC TPF Noob!

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    If they have that much make up you shouldn't need a filter!
     
  4. Marco120588

    Marco120588 TPF Noob!

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    well then what would be a great filter for flesh tones?
     
  5. MDowdey

    MDowdey Guest

    Marco, I dont think you should look for a filter buddy.


    maybe experiment with different types of lights i.e. softboxes...stuff like that...

    hope that helps!!

    md
     
  6. voodoocat

    voodoocat ))<>(( Supporting Member

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    I would focus on getting film that renders nice skin tones. Kodak Portra and Fuji NPS are great skin tone films.

    If you want a quick soft focus filter, stretch some black panty hose over the lens. You lose some light obviously, but it's a nice effect.
     
  7. drlynn

    drlynn TPF Noob!

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    I'd have to agree with Voodoo. I really love the Fuji NPS 160. It gives very warm and pleasing skin tones.
    If you have good lighting, fast lenses, and/or a tripod the pantyhose idea is also great for soft-focus type portraits. You can buy a soft-focus filter, but a cheap pair of nylons will work just as well, and save you $25 or so.
     
  8. S_Blackmoore

    S_Blackmoore TPF Noob!

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    Depends on your lighting and film. Filters are designed to modify the light coming into the camera to alter the final image. If you're using a daylight balanced film with tungsten light for example you would want to use an 82A or B filter to shift the color back from the red end to a more natural look.

    I would recommend getting a good photography book that shows examples of the differences between different filters in different light situations. Check Amazon. You can't throw a stick without hitting one over there.

    You might want to experiment with different films (negatives are a lot more forgiving than slides) and lighting situations before you go out buying filters. I didn't do that. Had I done more of my homework before I would have saved some cash. I have to say more often than not they've been a pain in the butt to deal with. Better to control your light and film the first time around rather than having to tweak it with a filter. Good luck.
     
  9. agirl316

    agirl316 TPF Noob!

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    You should not need a filter :D
     
  10. Dew

    Dew TPF Noob!

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    coming from a gal who wears a lot of make-up on cam

    &lt;-----------


    in most cases, if i wear my make-up too "light" it doesnt show up on camera.. depends on what u wanna show ... i know i wish most of my clients would wear more make-up for a shoot especially around the eyes because they can look a littly "puffy" without some contrast ... here's a few examples from my shoots ...


    she wore quite a bit of make-up, but u cant really see that its more than you can see on the camera

    [​IMG]

    in this one, i think if she didnt have any or much make-up on, there wouldnt be much contrast in her face.

    [​IMG]



    it all depends on what u want to do, i'd say play with your light a little bit :D
     

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