Which good mid-range camera and lens should i buy?

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by manuel87roma, Dec 16, 2017.

  1. manuel87roma

    manuel87roma TPF Noob!

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    Yeah i know you are right but is there anything in between? A compromize that is not a prime lens because if i can’t zoom at all it might be a problem.

    Ps: what you think about the CANON EOS REBEL sl2?


     
  2. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Derrel has nailed it. Read his suggestions again.

    There is nothing wrong with the Nikon D7200, but it has a DX-sized sensor. There's nothing inherently wrong with a DX camera, but if you're going for low light performance, either get a "full frame" (an FX) camera, or for really low light performance, the DX-sized Nikon D500 is outstanding, but it is outside your budget.

    The lenses that are bundled with the D7200 are not what you would call "fast" glass. I think you would be happier with either a 50mm 1.8 G or the 85 1.8 G for sharp, low-light photos. Depending on the space in which you have to work, an 85mm might be too long, but the 50mm could be the length to get.

    In the sample photos above, (reference a DX camera, because that's what I use) an 85mm taking those shots, you might have to be in about row 15. For the 50mm, you might be in row 1 to get that shot. With a FX camera to get those shots, you might have to be in Row 10 with an 85mm, and in the orchestra when using a 50mm. These are just approximations. Your mileage will vary.
     
  3. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Does the Canon EOS Rebel sl2 have WiFi built in? My Nikon came bundled with a WiFi "dongle" that works, but I don't use it. You can purchase those dongles separately, but If you need it built in, then that will limit your choices. For instance; those full-frame cameras that Derrel suggested are actually above the "mid level" and more toward the pro level, but I don't think they include WiFi.

    How important is WiFi? For me, getting better shots might be more important that being able to upload instantly. Besides; I like to look everything over carefully, and do some minor editing before I show anybody my photos.
     
  4. ac12

    ac12 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I would suggest a Canon T7i.
    The high school that I help the yearbook uses the T7i as the night and indoor sport camera, as the high ISO is 25600. Yeah you loose IQ at the higher ISO, but at least you can get a shot.

    But I am not familiar with Canon lenses to make a suggestion there.

    Manuel, you have to make a decision; lens speed or zoom. Everything is a compromise.
    And FAST zooms are EXPENSIVE.
    One of these is the $1,000 Sigma 50-100 f/1.8. Which BTW does not have IS/VR/OS, and I would really want for low light.
    I went through this decision, then got a 35mm f/1.7 to shoot in low light. I wanted the speed more than I wanted the zoom.
     
  5. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    My recommendation is based on 1) a used camera 2)a used Nikon FX or "full-frame" d-slr camera and 3)a 50mm single focal length lens or 4)a fixed focal length 85mm f/1.8 AF-S G lens of superlative optical quality 5)designed to give you the ability to shoot the exact types of telephoto lens-captures you show in your example pictures 6)so that the total budget for the High-ISO capable,low-light-capable is around $1,000.

    By my way of looking at it, even the now-aged Nikon D700, 12-megapixel full-frame camera, or a used D3s 12-MP full-frame camera, or a $500 used Nikon D600 camera, will give you very good higher-ISO captures, and will work splendidly with a used $65 to $95 50mm f/1.8 AF-D lens, or with a used $300 85/1.8 AF-S G Nikkor lens.

    Personally, I favor the bigger pixels and wider image capture area of Nikon FX-format over Nikon's DX format. With FX, 24mm is a wide-angle, 28 a wide, 35 a semi-wide, 50 a normal, 85 a short telephoto. With DX, everything is effed up...

    There are a lot of used Nikon-branded 50mm and 85mm autofocus lenses out there. They were designed for use on a 24x36mm image capture area; once you start going down-sized to a DX-format camera, then you need to find suitably "fast" lenses designed for DX cameras, and that's very difficult on a $1,000 budget for body and lens. There are LOADS of used Nikon-made lenses for FX-format use; the DX-lens field is in large part, slowish lenses designed for low cost and lower-tier performance, with some exceptions, and very few of them. The key is simple: buy a second-hand, Nikon, full-frame camera, and start there.

    Start with the horse, not with the cart.
     
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