Which lens for me ? ? ?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Draken, Aug 9, 2008.

  1. Draken

    Draken TPF Noob!

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    which is a better lens choice for me the Sigma 10-20mm or the Canon EF 17-40mm L ? i like wide angle since i mainly do landscape photography the L lens is about $200 more than what i wanted to spend but is it really worth it?
    cheers,,

    Mike. :D
     
  2. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Both are good solid choices - I would first ask if you are looking for a lens for a full frame camera in the future - since I hear that the sigma 10-20 will not work with those cameras (or has performance isssues).
    For the 350 crop sensor its certainly the widest of the two lenses so if landscapes are very important to you I would go for the sigma (remember you get an effective focal length boost on crop sensor)
    if you look here and scroll down to the bottom there is a comparison of the canon and sigma 10-20mm lenses - with quality being the same the sigma is the lens of choice due to price.
    http://www.juzaphoto.com/eng/articles/lens_reviews.htm

    If, however - you are after a little bit more of a general landscape to portrate lens then the 17-40mm might suit you more (it gets to at least 50mm effective focal length at the long end I think)
     
  3. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    The difference between your 18-55 and the Canon L 17-40 at f/8 (or other typical landscape aperture setting giving a lot of DOF) on your camera is that the L will be bigger, heavier, and more flare prone. Any significant sharpness differences would probably only be evident with the aperture wide open. As soon as it's closed a stop or two any lens should be razor sharp. For landscape photography with an APS format DSLR I'd go with the cheap 18-55 over the fancy 17-40 any day. On a 35mm DSLR I'd go with the 17-40.

    Buy the 10-20 and get freaky with the ultra wide angle! :)
     
  4. Draken

    Draken TPF Noob!

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    oh awesome thanks for your replies :) the only thing thats kinda putting me off the Sigma is the apparent issues with vignetting when using filters and i religiously use ND and ND grad's although my local camera shop has assured me there is definalty a way around this using a slim filter and wide angle holder im still a little worried as almost every review i hear about the lens says there is still some Vignetting no matter what so im rather confused guess the only way to know is to try and see :)

    thanks guys
     
  5. djacobox372

    djacobox372 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The difference between 10mm and 17mm is HUGE.... so keep that in mind. 17mm is equivalent to 26mm on a film slr, whereas 10mm is like a 15mm!

    I'm not certain, but I would expect that the vignetting problem you speak of would be be less of a factor as you zoom in. I've not noticed much of a vignetting past 12mm. Also, vignetting is so easy to deal with when shooting digital that it's no longer a deal breaker for me.

    The deal breaker on the sigma would be whether you plan on using it on a full-frame camera. Expect to do a lot of cropping at 10mm! but also know that as you zoom in to 20mm you nearly reach full-frame coverage.
     

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