Why are my photos granular?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by inou, Nov 8, 2017.

  1. inou

    inou TPF Noob!

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    Hi,

    I took this photo with DSLR Canon D600. It was a sunny day, why did the phto come out granular?

    Imagebin - Somewhere to Store Random Things


     
  2. photo1x1.com

    photo1x1.com TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Hi and welcome to the forum.
    The image is in fact slightly noisy, but it is not that bad. It is due to the fact that it was shot with ISO400, but it could have easily been shot at ISO100 and would have way less noise. Also it would have been sharper if you had not used an aperture of f20. F9-f11 usually gives the sharpest all around image quality for landscape shots like this. If you go higher, an effect called diffraction gets more and more noticeable.
    What do you know about exposure in general? It seems you let the camera decide which settings to choose rather than doing it yourself. It´s time for you to dive further into the great world of photography.
     
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  3. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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  4. Braineack

    Braineack Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    If this is actually the case, I don't understand how anyone would ever shoot Canon ever.



    remove your UV filter, don't stop down past f16, and achieve focus before shooting.
     
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  5. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Welcome to the forum.

    I believe you mean Canon 600D? Or T3i. As mentioned by others it's partially lens and camera. The camera itself was first released 6 years ago. With a sensor from previous to that design wise. Then adding to it the diffraction from the lens.
     
  6. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    I thought the issue was mostly atmospheric conditions...looks like a lot of particulate matter in the summer-time air there.
     
  7. john.margetts

    john.margetts No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The air is certainly very hazy.
     
  8. inou

    inou TPF Noob!

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    Hi guys, thanks for the replies.

    Wow 6 years have i had this camera now? how time flies. I have the 70D as well, but the 600D (thank you for correcting :) is the one i take with me.

    Why do you then say "i cannot understand how anycone can shoot Canon ever", is Canon so bad? so the next one should be a Nikon?

    I am nil in photography and i want to "dig in", yes I let the camera choose for me, but I watched a video series on Lynda.com about photography and all it told me was about "balancing", which in my engineering terms is "how to make the center of gravity of the picture remain towards the geometric center". Struggling to find a sweet hands on quick guide that ramps me up the stairs quickly. I travel a lot and have lost as many opportunitites to keep records, here's a proof of a disaster by my Samsung: Imagebin - Somewhere to Store Random Things

    I'm willing to learn, I just don't to learn by mistakes anymore, and having done so many, I am more pressed to spend time on A-grade hints/tips/training
     
  9. smoke665

    smoke665 TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Looks to me like a like a little bit of the Blue haze phenomenon common in the Smoky Mountains, when tiny hydrocarbon particles released by vegetation chemically react with ozone molecules, producing particles that selectively scatter the blue light, giving a blue haze.
     
  10. Braineack

    Braineack Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    look at my comment again, and the quoted text.

    @photo1x1.com suggested the issue was shooting at ISO400 and not ISO100. If that was actually the case, then that is just sad.


    That image was shot at 1/200sec, iso400, and f/20. it appears the flash also fired. I believe there may have been some atmospheric conditions in that image lowering the contrast/clarity, but I also think camera settings were mainly to blame.

    Do you have a UV filter on the end of your 18-55?
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2017
  11. TCampbell

    TCampbell Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    It needs a bit of processing... the data is there but you'll need to tease it out. You could do a bit more if it was shot and saved as RAW.

    Screen Shot 2017-11-09 at 10.35.25 AM.jpg

    It suffers a bit from a mushy histogram. I set the white point (which was basically fine as-is) set the black point, but noticed that the image still lacked contrast. I used a "clarity" adjustment to boost the mid-contrast (take the slightly lighter mid-tones and make them brighter and take the slightly darker mid-tones and make them darker) and this helps tease out more definition in the trees. I did use some sharpening (at f/20 you were getting a bit of diffraction). I also boosted the saturation a bit.

    BTW, I really didn't need to deal with noise... noise really wasn't a problem.

    There is some haze in the air and you can see how the background landscape goes blue. Lightroom has a de-hazing tool that can help reduce that. I nudged it up slightly but this was just a couple of quick adjustments to show what you can do with this. I could have used tools to reduce saturation in just the blue channel in just those areas by taking a bit more time.

    Anyway... hopefully you get the idea.
     
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  12. photo1x1.com

    photo1x1.com TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Lynda is usually a great source for tutorials and courses. I learned so much there about various software. But there are many courses, maybe you just had bad luck ;).
    I must admit my first answer could have been a little clearer. Grain is what is caused by ISO settings. The higher the ISO, the more grain will be introduced. Your image is only slightly grainy, and that is probably due to the ISO400 chosen by your camera. The blurry look is very likely caused by using an aperture of f20 (or as Derrel - who really is almost always right ;) - has suggested by the atmospheric condition that don´t introduce noise, but rather blur - see here on Wikipedia). That introduces diffraction. Would you have stopped down to f11 for example, the image should have been much sharper. That brings us to the balance from your Lynda course. Lowering ISO from 400 to 100 would have made your image darker by two so called "stops". Choosing f10 instead of f20 would have made your image brighter again by the same two stops. So you would have achieved the same brightness, but the image quality would have improved a lot.
    If you are looking for a qick guide, let me humbly recommend my youtube photography course. My goal is to get you up and running without talking much ;). It is still in progress, but the chapters that are online should give you a good start.
     

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