Why not ISO 200?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by SquirrelNuts, Feb 6, 2004.

  1. SquirrelNuts

    SquirrelNuts TPF Noob!

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    I generally see everyone using either ISO 100 (which I prefer) or ISO 400, but never ISO 200...why is this? I understand that ISO 200 is only one stop away from either 100 or 400, but is there another reason?

    -SquirrelNuts
     
  2. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    I used to use ISO 200 color 35mm all the time; Kodak Gold 200 was my snapshot film of choice. But these days I just don't use much color, and I hardly ever shoot 35mm.

    It's just personal preference. Sometimes ISO 200 may seem like "fence sitting"; you know, either go for the fine grain, or go for the speed.

    And also that there are a lot more choices in ISO 100 and 400. There are very few choices in ISO 200 BW, and if you look at pro films you'll tend to find ISO 160 rather than ISO 200.

    I think a lot of folks do shoot ISO 400 film at ISO 200.
     
  3. abonecronedone

    abonecronedone TPF Noob!

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    Quality films don´t use to be ISO 200. It´s more likely a versatile choice for amateurs
     
  4. Jeff Canes

    Jeff Canes No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    If I recall right 200 ISO came out in the mid. to late 80’s with the boom in 35mm point and shoots. I get 200 when I buy 35mm at the drugstore. And it has worked fine for me.
     
  5. MrEd31

    MrEd31 TPF Noob!

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    I am refering to black and white films, and this is only speculation but...

    ISO ratings are just suggestions. In most cases, they are poor suggestions. When shooting Ilford Hp5+, most people will find that it is infact a stop slower, ISO 200. The reality of ISO numbers is that they are a place to start. I'm not sure this answers your question, but maybe it gives you an idea of what ISO settings are about.
     
  6. MrEd31

    MrEd31 TPF Noob!

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    I am refering to black and white films, and this is only speculation but...

    ISO ratings are just suggestions. In most cases, they are poor suggestions. When shooting Ilford Hp5+, most people will find that it is infact a stop slower, ISO 200. The reality of ISO numbers is that they are a place to start. I'm not sure this answers your question, but maybe it gives you an idea of what ISO settings are about.
     
  7. MrEd31

    MrEd31 TPF Noob!

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    I am refering to black and white films, and this is only speculation but...

    ISO ratings are just suggestions. In most cases, they are poor suggestions. When shooting Ilford Hp5+, most people will find that it is infact a stop slower, ISO 200. The reality of ISO numbers is that they are a place to start. I'm not sure this answers your question, but maybe it gives you an idea of what ISO settings are about.
     

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ilford hp5 exposed at iso 200

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is tgere a lot more grain on iso 400 than iso 200 film

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shooting ilford hp5 at iso 200

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why an iso 200?