Winter Photography

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by redtippmann, Oct 2, 2008.

  1. redtippmann

    redtippmann TPF Noob!

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    Well I have been Skiing and taking photographs for a while and I was wondering if you guys think I would be ok to take my D50 on the slopes? I was reading my manual and it said it operated at the lowest temp. of 32*F or 0*C. So Would it be damaging to my camera in any way? b/c I would be outside for a while.
     
  2. Bryant

    Bryant TPF Noob!

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    I really don't know much about Nikon's. I doubt it would effect anything because I've taken my 40D with my press pass to the Snowboard US Open in Vermont for all day, like 8-8 and it's completely fine. Photographers take camera's into the backcountry and have no problems so I wouldn't be nervous, just don't get snow in it.

    I wouldn't suggest riding with it though. If you were to fall, it would probably destroy it. Unless your walking up to the spot.
     
  3. Atropine

    Atropine TPF Noob!

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    The batteries are your biggest concern. Always keep a couple of extra sets of charged batteries close to your body keeping them warm and replace when needed. You can probably reuse the ones you replaced because they get better again once warmed up.
     
  4. rubbertree

    rubbertree TPF Noob!

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    0C?? No way! They work in far colder temps than that. I agree about bringing some extra batteries and keeping them close to your body to keep warm though.
     
  5. SpeedTrap

    SpeedTrap TPF Noob!

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    just remember also to let it warm up slow after you have been out in the cold to prevent any condensation in the body or lens.
     
  6. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    It'll work better actually. Photosensors produce lower noise at colder temps :D If something dies it'll be the LCD but the only reports I've heard of that happening were well below -10deg
     
  7. JerryPH

    JerryPH No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I've had my D200 out in -20F weather, but not for days at a time (we're talking maybe 4-5 hours at most) without damage. As mentioned, the first thing to die fast is the batteries. When cold, power is lost fast.

    Under those conditions, I do not use the battery grip, but have 1-2 batteries in a shirt pocket close to my warm skin and 1 in the camera, and swap them out about once every 30-60 minutes for best functionality.

    Keep a microfibre cloth handy and make sure you *DO* have a protective filter on your lens, as you will be wiping it pretty often when snow gets on it. I saw a guy with a clear showercap over his camera on the slopes once. He had cut a small hole in it for the lens and wrapped the rest of the camera in a protective plastic cover. I thought that was rather clever of him.

    My D200 is weather sealed, but this could be a good idea for you to consider if you get the camera covered in snow and wet often during a day skiing.
     
  8. Hawaii Five-O

    Hawaii Five-O My alter-egos have been banned. :( Now I must be

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    nah, I wouldn't take it with you, maybe just take a P&S. They still take great pictures and are small. PLus if you fall and land on your pack youll break your back and your camera. Your warrenty is probably invalid below the operating temperatures. Other peoples cameras may of worked in lower temps, but that dosen't mean they won't have problems down the road early on. Electronics don't always show problems right away. Manufactures list those numbers for a reason.


    I don't think it is really worth it to take an expensive camera out skiing unless you could afford another one easy if this one gets broken.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2008
  9. Bifurcator

    Bifurcator TPF Noob!

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    I think it depends on his ability to ski. I'm ancient as dust and I ski without falling. I still fall occasionally snowboarding but not skiing. I take my camera skiing occasionally.

    A few tips:

    • Watch out where you breath because it can fog surfaces that take a LONG time to unfog!
    • A camera that won't operate in ski weather will NOT break! It just won't work while it's that cold. As soon as it warms up you're good to go.
    • Carry it in an enclosed case like the old-school leather cases that are shaped like a camera. If you carry it inside your jacket you're asking for instant lens fog as soon as you take it out to take a shot.
    • Don't ski too fast! :D For the obvious reasons.
    • If you do fall open the case immediately and brush off any snow before it has a chance to melt and cause trouble.
    • Use a UV filter at any altitudes suitable for skiing. Without one you may get blue shadows and odd/over bright lighting that can be hard to edit out in post.
    • Carry one of those chemical hand-warmers with you. IF your lens gets fogged place the hand-warmer in the camera shaped case for several minutes (only) and then remove. Repeat as needed until the fog is removed.
    • If fog occurs on the inside of the lens (rare but it happens) stop skiing, don't shake or jolt the camera, place the hand-warmer in the case under the lens barrel until the fog is gone. The reason for not jostling the camera around under those circumstances is that the condensation can collect and streak which may leave marks.
    • Others have said more with the extra battery, exposing the device to the elements as slowly as possible, and etc. which are all good tips. I just put the camera bag (closed) out on the porch while I'm getting ready to ski - by the time I'm ready usually the camera has weather adjusted itself to the cold. etc.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2008
  10. JerryPH

    JerryPH No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I ski and snowboard at 48, and have no issues taking my camera with me ANYWHERE. That's what insurance is for (at least my insurance covers me in the event I drop the camera off the ski lift, and it decides to start the "apres-ski" before me. ;)
     
  11. redtippmann

    redtippmann TPF Noob!

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  12. Mike_E

    Mike_E No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Nikon has anti-fog wipes for your lens that you could try.

    I got mine from B&H but haven't tried them yet, winter comes slowly to Mississippi.
     

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