Working with Slide Film.

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by New Hampshire, Apr 23, 2007.

  1. New Hampshire

    New Hampshire TPF Noob!

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    When I bought my new camera, I decided to stay with film because a pro photographer friend of mine convinced me slide film and landscapes are a match made in heaven. So I have progressed along knwoing full well eventually I would be using slide films. I have researched a lot, asked many questions of my friend, and now I want to expand a bit and see what others opinions, suggestions and advice is.

    Basically I know slide films have a VERY LIMITED exposure lattitude. My friend and all the various sources I have looked at pound into an individual that bracketing is the key to perfect exposure. But rarely is it discussed how much bracketing, and in what stop increment. For example, I have heared 5 eposures...one to the meter, two over in 1/2 stop increments, 2 under in half stop increments. Does this sound reasonable? Or would 2 over and under in one stop increments be better?

    I also have another interesting dilemma. My Camera (A Canon EOS Elan 7) does not have a spot metering capability. I have been told you try to expose for the higlights with slide film. So does anyone have suggestions on dealing with this dilemma?

    Any other suggestions, tips or advice, please feel free to share. As usual, Im sure Ill have more questions to come.

    Brian
     
  2. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Brian: just go shoot a couple of rolls. You already have a pretty good idea of how to go about shooting it - so just do it. I think you'll immediately feel better - and much more empowered about the stuff - when you get them back.

    On your first couple of rolls, yes - bracket. But more importantly, start an exposure log for each frame. Write down your initial exposure, then your +/- stop exposures, for each frame, for the entire roll. Sit down with your slides and review them while you study the log. So many of your own thoughts and questions while you shot the roll will come flooding back, and the answers will be right there in the slides.

    After you've done a few rolls like this, you will become much better and it's unlikely you'll feel the need to bracket as much - unless of course, you're at that once-in-a-lifetime place and time. ;)

    Good luck! :D
     
  3. fmw

    fmw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I agree with Terri. Also note that while transparency film has virtually no exposure latitude, how you get there is no different than with any other film. Personally, I stopped exposure bracketing 20 years ago but it can be an effective tool if you need it. Use whatever techniques get the job done.

    By the way, the reason it doesn't have much exposure latitude is that you are viewing the film. There is no intermediate process such as printing to adjust the luminosity for poor exposure. The film doesn't really behave any differently than print film. Good luck.
     
  4. jwkwd

    jwkwd TPF Noob!

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    I absolutely agree with both Terri and FMW. I shoot slide about half the time and find myself only bracketing when something seems questionable. For instance ( with me ), the shutter speed is bouncing between a couple of speeds, or the aperture would be right, only above and below where it is set.
     
  5. myopia

    myopia TPF Noob!

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    i found slide film easy to get into. just shoot a roll and u will love it. dont be intimidated by the hype bs.
     
  6. New Hampshire

    New Hampshire TPF Noob!

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    Thank you everyone. Suggestions noted.

    Couple more quick question.

    This one is about Black and White slide film. What are the advantages of using B+W slide film over print B+W? I know COLOR Slide Film has teh obvious saturation properties, as well as increased contrast. Does the B+W simply offer more contrast? And is it worth it going B+W slide vs. regular print?

    And second question. This is about ISO setting with the color slide film. I have heard people using say, 50 or 100 ISOs, but setting the camera for lower ISO, say 50 down to 30 ISO, or 100 down to 80 ISO. What are the advantages/disadvatanges in this?

    Brian
     

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