X-Ray Vision on ur Camera Cellphone!

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Saeid, Dec 12, 2004.

  1. Saeid
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    Saeid New Member

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    What u guys think if this? Most great things are discovered by accident huh? ;) No but it makes u wonder, Black doesnt really exist, Light bounces off every color except of black (physics 101) ;)
    Its not really X-Ray since its not releasing x-RAYS... and it did, it would be a health concern.

    A developer in Tokyo has created an add-on for Vodafone handsets that's meant to be used as a night filter to let people take pictures with their phones in the dark.

    Unfortunately, the night vision camera has an unexpected side effect, according to Japanese developer Yamada Denshi. In the right circumstances, it allows users to see a lot more than they bargained for.

    As well as taking snaps in the dark, the Yamada Denshi infrared filter apparently sees through people's clothes.

    The problem arises because the filter uses the distribution of heat to create its pictures. When attached to a high-end camera, the filter can see though certain kinds of clothing and is reportedly particularly effective on dark bikinis.

    The handset most often used with the filter -- the V602-SH -- is only available in Japan.

    A Vodafone spokeswoman confirmed that the Peeping Tom accessory isn't a problem outside of Japan. She added that because Yamada Denshi is a third-party supplier, Vodafone's control is limited. "They are not an approved third party," she said.

    "We would never go to market with a phone with any kind of capacity to see people naked," she said.

    Camera phones have long prompted fears of voyeurism, leading several gyms to ban them to prevent people from using them to take inappropriate pictures.

    Voyeurism with camera phones became such a problem in South Korea that the government ruled that phones must make a noise when pictures are taken.


    Source: http://www.cnet.com.au/mobilephones/phones/0,39025953,40002060,00.htm

    [​IMG]
  2. DocFrankenstein
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    DocFrankenstein Clinically Insane?

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    Where do you get that filter again? :D
  3. Lepospondyl
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    Lepospondyl New Member

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    Actually, infrared ability to see through certain clothing is old news. The Sony DSC-505V (it thinks that's it) had IR emitters that in the right conditions, you could "see" through certain swim suit materials. I believe the problem was tan-through suits. Sony no longer allows full manual control with IR on, making daytime picture WAY overexposed.

    However, a few ND filters, and you're back in action... or so I've read.
  4. Saeid
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    Saeid New Member

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    Well that picture was actually taken by someone who said that this technique works... along with some more adult themed pics! ;)

    But ya the only thing i could also think of was filters, cause i dont think there is anything u can do to the lens of chipset of the camera to make it see-thru clothes.
  5. Shinnentai
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    Shinnentai New Member

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    Hallo. Found this thread while searching the forums for IR related topics.

    A little late perhapse (month old thread), but I thought I'd share these:

    Link 1

    Link 2

    Found these a few months ago while researching the "x-ray camcorder" phenomenon. Don't morally advocate candid shots using this, but I think it has potential for interesting IR studio and/or modeled shots. Seems like it might work with IR film as well as digital, given a little fiddling (don't know for sure, as I lack experience with IR film).

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