You Don't Need ISO 1billion For Concert Photography

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by musicaleCA, Sep 18, 2009.

  1. musicaleCA

    musicaleCA TPF Noob!

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    Nor a 5D, a 50D, D300 or D700. Case in point, these were taken with my 450D in the past week:

    ISO 400, f/4.5, 1/250, 40mm

    [​IMG]

    ISO 800, f/2.8, 1/80, 70mm (that's right; no need for the 1/focal length rule if you know how to keep the camera stable)

    [​IMG]

    ISO 800, f/2.8, 1/25, 24mm

    [​IMG]

    Now, I'm not saying you wouldn't be able to do better with a higher-end camera. And I'm not saying these are fantastic super-awesome shots. This is more to illustrate the point that you should never let your gear get you down. Figure out how to work with the gear you have, and fight for every last inch you can.
     
  2. dtzitko

    dtzitko TPF Noob!

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    Good shots! I like #1 the best. Also dig his shirt.
     
  3. TJ K

    TJ K No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Well it worked for those pictures quite well but sometimes the lighting is different and pretty low and depending on the concert if you're going to hard rock or something there is going to be a lot of movement and jumping, etc... so you would need a higher ISO to freeze the action. But good job on the first pic.
     
  4. Village Idiot

    Village Idiot No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    That's pretty close to the shutter speed vs. focal length rule. Try shooting at 70mm and 1/15. That's why I like IS.
     
  5. inTempus

    inTempus TPF Noob!

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    It depends on so many things. ISO 400, 1/125 and f/4.5? You had ample light in that first shot (which is my favorite too).

    I've shot bands that thrashed around like convulsing meth-heads. To get much more than a blur I had to shoot ISO 3200 f/2.8 to get to a shutter speed of 1/125 to freeze motion.

    So, as with all things, it depends on the venue and the lighting. If you can't flash, you're at the mercy of the venue. If you've never shot there before, you better bring out the big guns (high ISO and fast glass) to make sure you're properly heeled. :)
     
  6. schumionbike

    schumionbike TPF Noob!

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    I shot a ballet before with a p&s camera and the place was pretty dark . The picture turn out okay, had some keepers. I was shooting at 800 ISO (couldn't go any higher than that and the noise from it was like a Nikon D3 at 25,600 ISO or even worst). Shot at like 1/10 shutter at like 50 mm zoom on a tripod, didn't have any vr or anything. You definitely could work with your equipment to get some nice shot. You might have a higher keeper ratio if you make good use of good equipment but don't give up on something just because your equipments isn't the best.
     
  7. Jaszek

    Jaszek No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I've shot concerts with my 450D
    BTW nice shots :D.
     
  8. bigtwinky

    bigtwinky No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Those are some nice shots, but as said, I thnk its venue and show dependant. I've been to some shows where the lighting was crap (smaller venue), which would require higher ISO to get a sharper image. There are also bands that move alot more, making shooting harder.

    But like you said, don't let your gear get you down and stop you from trying. Trying, practice, experimenting and failing are all part of learning photography. So if you don't shoot something thinking that you can't due to gear, give it a shot anyways and see what ya get.

    If anything, you will have to be more selective as to when you shoot, chosing better angles to shoot from, to get a better photograph. Which is what photography is about, thinking before clicking.
     
  9. musicaleCA

    musicaleCA TPF Noob!

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    Indeed, and that's my point with this post. I've known some people that just give up and don't try because they don't have access to those super high ISOs. They are nice, and they are certainly the life-line that can help secure solid images for you, and as Tharm (er, InTempus) noted, there are cases where high ISOs are definitely a necessity. But then again, if you don't have ISO3200, then it's time to turn around and see what different perspectives you can get (or pretend that you were being artistic and do something funky with that motion blur :lol: ).

    Village Idiot: Yeah, except most of my shots at 1/15 suffered from motion blur. 1/25 was on the precipice.
     
  10. epp_b

    epp_b No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I get by just fine with ISO 1600 and lower, and I rarely go faster than f/2.8.

    Freeze, shmeeze. Freezing action for the sake of freezing action looks boring. Freezing just the right parts of a photo and showing action where it matters is a lot more interesting.
     
  11. kundalini

    kundalini Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    ...... but if you have the capability of ISO 1 billion............

    wouldn't that be a benefit?
     
  12. c.cloudwalker

    c.cloudwalker TPF Noob!

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    I cannot help but agree with you.

    As we discussed last night, I never shot anything faster than 400 ASA and I did shoot some concerts. We managed to get those shots on film so why can't you with (just about) any digital camera. I am sure that if I went and looked through my books about music and bands I would find some pretty horrendous grain because some photogs pushed their film or used whatever high ASA film existed then. So be it.

    But, maybe, one needs to think about this type of photography the same as a sport shooter does. There is always a moment in the action when the action (almost) stops. That would be the time to shoot. There is also a time when you have more light and you need to be able to combine the two to get the shots.

    Small clubs with very little light are always going to be a problem but they are also, usually, the easiest to deal with. Both the band and the club want to get their names in print if they can. So shoot with a flash. Concert light is always pretty harsh and a flash photo is rarely going to look out of place.

    And if you shoot color, put a gel on your flash unit so it looks like it's part of the show.
     

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