Aftermarket Ebay LP-E6 Batteries, Tested..

Discussion in 'Canon Accessories' started by SimpleSimon, Aug 27, 2013.

  1. SimpleSimon

    SimpleSimon TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2013
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Australia.
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Sorry, forgot to post the results of the test on the OEM Canon LP-E6 battery. I tested this battery twice, it was charged both times with the canon battery charger.
    This battery is 3 years old and NEW it should have a rating of 1800mAh.

    The results were:
    Test 1 -- 1561mAh.
    Test 2 -- 1572mAh.

    So given the results being so close togeter i am confident that this battery after 3 years is sitting at about 87% of capacity.

    Cheers.

    Simon.


     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2013
  2. EDL

    EDL No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2012
    Messages:
    697
    Likes Received:
    53
    Location:
    Western Pennsylvania
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Actually, it's not the same argument and I can explain how.

    It's true, Canon most likely has a third party that supplies their batteries, but you can bet they have certain quality and engineering agreements on those batteries. In addition to pretending to be a photographer I also do woodworking. Many people getting into woodworking are often surprised to find the Delta, or Jet drill press they want is the same machine Harbor Freight sells under their brand name...but with one big difference; Delta and Jet have quality assurance agreements and inspectors at the Taiwanese and Chinese factories. Their equipment is picked off the line from the ones that meet certain specific quality points in terms of tolerances. The Harbor Freight stuff is the junk no one else will take. Same basic machines, but no where near as precise.

    Granted, Delta and Jet also pay to have certain changes made as well, like different motors, or changes in design to make their tools a little different too.

    I bet Canon requires their batteries meet certain quality standards, where as the white label no names are just whatever comes off the line that no one else takes. In that regard, it makes sense that the generics are a 50-50 chance. Some are good, some are not.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    44,789
    Likes Received:
    17,028
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    A good percentage of aftermarket or third-party batteries are cheap, imitation-grade, Chinese junk. Nikon's original, official batteries are AMAZING in terms of life. I have a Nikon D2x battery that was bought May 3, 2005. Right now, the in-camera battery tester shows that the battery is on 3, in a scale that runs as follows NEW 0 - 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - REPLACE.

    This original equipment Nikon battery will STILL deliver over 2,000 frames in a day. And the battery is eight years old. I bet there is not a single aftermarket cheapie battery made that could have come even half that far without dying.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. TCampbell

    TCampbell Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2012
    Messages:
    3,609
    Likes Received:
    1,551
    Location:
    Dearborn, MI
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    All of my "current" batteries are Canon -- I don't buy OEM anymore. But I used to.

    Back when I had my T1i, I had 3 original Canon batteries and 5 after-market batteries from various brands. I noticed a definite pattern.

    When you own 8 batteries for one camera, some of them are going to be setting on the shelf for a few weeks. What I noticed was that even though all the batteries were charged to full, if the 3rd party batteries were allowed to go unused for a couple of weeks, they self-discharged a lot of their power. But the OEM batteries did NOT self-discharge much power at all... an unused OEM battery could go into the camera after sitting for a few weeks (or a month or more) and still have enough charge on them to read "full".

    I number all of my batteries because its' not good for battery health to allow a battery to sit unused for too long... they need to get used from time to time. This means they're all getting their fair-share of use. But after about a year, a lot of the 3rd party batteries would no longer take a charge. After about 2 years, none of the 3rd party batteries wanted to take a charge, but the OEM batteries were fine.

    I paid nearly 3x as much for OEM batteries as compared to the 3rd party batteries, but estimated that the OEM batteries last at least 3 times as long as compared to the assortment of batteries I owned.

    I concluded that

    (a) the third party batteries didn't _really_ save me money and
    (b) since I place a high value on "reliability". It's worth something for me to be confident that if I charged a battery, let it rest on the shelf for a few weeks or more, that when I grab that battery and throw it in the camera, it'll STILL have a charge on it and also when I recharge it I don't want to be surprised to learn that the battery doesn't want to accept a charge anymore.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. pixmedic

    pixmedic The Mustached Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2012
    Messages:
    14,972
    Likes Received:
    7,097
    Location:
    Central Florida
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I had a few third party batteries for the D300 and D90 and never had any problems with them.
    when i went to get new batteries for the D7100 and D7000, ($70 each) i looked at some third party options. they were obviously MUCH cheaper, but i noticed that some of them were listed as "decoded" and some even stated they did not function in battery grips. I don't know if they just meant the batteries reporting to the camera, or not work in a grip at all....and i had never seen "decoded" vs non "decoded" before on a battery listing. I was confused just enough to go with all OEM batteries this time.
     
  6. runnah

    runnah Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2012
    Messages:
    14,630
    Likes Received:
    7,532
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I have a bevy of batteries, some with with my grip, some don't .
     
  7. SimpleSimon

    SimpleSimon TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2013
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Australia.
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
  8. ghache

    ghache No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2010
    Messages:
    3,570
    Likes Received:
    295
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    always used aftermarked batteries and they always worked fine. buy the chipped one so your camera reads them. they are a bit more expensive but you still save a load of money.
     
  9. Masejoer

    Masejoer TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2013
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    United States
    Please update us on your battery analysis. The Wasabi LPE6 batteries I picked up are testing out at 1300mAh with a 500mA drain. The last Sterlingtek cells I used performed very poorly, compared to the same product I had purchased 5 years prior. I have no idea who to buy batteries from anymore, other than Canon.
     
  10. SimpleSimon

    SimpleSimon TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2013
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Australia.
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Masejoer.

    I can vary my load applied and i have done tests fromm 400mA to 100mA and these batteries dont vary much at all.

    I have received 2 more batteries from the supplier to replace the 2 origional ones i received. These 2 are of the same weight, BUT still only have a capacity of about 800mAh which is a long way off the 2100mAh that they say on them.

    I have included pictures and weighs for a reason, as i have found with all batteries that i have tested, this includes the LP-E6, NI-MH AA's and even some 18650's all weigh less than the quality brand ones.

    In all my research in relation to Li-ION batteries, if the ratings are higher than the OEM ones then they probably are not. Eg, the LP-E6's say 2100mAh (OEM 1800mAh) and are really only 800mAh. Some 18650's i have say 3000mAh (Quality ones 2200mAh) and are only 700mAh. Ni-MH AA's that i use for the Speedlite say 2500mah (Quality ones 2100-2500mAh) these tested about 720mAh!!

    Its hard to know what your buying, if there really cheap, then they are usually of very poor quality and a lower capacity of what there sold as.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2013
  11. Masejoer

    Masejoer TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2013
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    United States
    Yes, I understand the capacity differences, degradation, etc of Li-Ion cells. I used to use select Trustfire cells, but have switched solely to Panasonic 3100mAh and 3400mAh cells pulled from laptop packs. I use 18650 and 16340 cells the most often.

    I received some SterlingTek LP-E6 batteries and they tested to 1900mAh on average (between two cells). This is much better than the Wasabi cells I tried, and sent back. My 2 year old genuine Canon pack tested at 2100mAh with a 500mA drain and 2000mAh with a 1A drain. The STK and Canon batteries both weigh 76 grams (two gram scales, and one fractional kilogram scale). I am not sure there is much point in testing other batteries at this time. The SterlingTek product appears to be as close as we can get to the Canon battery. I purchased 2 more after my tests the last couple days. I do have another battery coming from a fourth brand, but I am not expecting more than 1400-1500mAh.

    I am glad the STK batteries are working out. For my older camera, I had received some bad batteries from the company last year. My previous STK batteries lasted 5 years before they suddenly dropped in capacity.

    Real drain tests are the only real way of knowing how different batteries compare in capacity. Also having your analyzer calibrated and tested for accuracy, against a known load, helps provide consistent, valid results. My other hobby charger, an iMax B6, is less inaccurate, but I keep it around for charging up cells to either 3.8V or 4.2V. I only need one battery most of the time, so my spares get charged to 3.8V and kept in a sealed bag in the refrigerator. I have only started this recently. Compared to room temperature, Li-Ion can last anywhere from 3x to 10x longer, stored just above 0ÂșC, depending on the charge level.

    Basically, if we can find 18500 cells with a certain capacity, then the LP-E6 should also be able to support the same capacity. The cheapest, decent 18500 cell with any real capacity that I have found is the Sanyo UR18500FK - 1700mAh and you can get two for $10 retail. I would think that a manufacturer could make $5-10 profit per battery if they used these cells. After all, they could get the cells for a lot less in wholesale.

    Thank you for the tests! We need more real information about the different batteries. If enough people did capacity, performance, and lifespan testing, it is possible that we could see actual improvements in aftermarket battery quality.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2013
  12. SimpleSimon

    SimpleSimon TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2013
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Australia.
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit


    Hello Masejoer.

    Thanks for your results as i have only tested 1 unknown brand of LP-E6 bateries and your testing of known brands is truly a great help to many in the photograpic world. I use a lot of 18650 and did not think about getting them from laptop battery packs. Thats where i might go next time for quality cells.

    My test equipment is not calabrated but i make sure i test all batteries the same, i charge them the same and test all batteries against either OEM ones or a battery of known quality.


    Thanks again.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

aftermarket lp-e6 battery

,

best aftermarket canon lpe6 battery

,
best aftermarket lp e6
,

best aftermarket lp-e6 battery

,

dste lp-e6 review

,
dste lp-e6 review 6d
,
ebay canon pl 6 e battery
,
lp-e6 aftermarket reviews