Boom suggestion

Discussion in 'Lighting and Hardware' started by smoke665, Aug 26, 2019.

  1. JBPhotog

    JBPhotog No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Nope. This is the 'proper' way to rig an overhead light. Even if the thumb screws were loose the head won't fall, gravity holds it onto the spigot. I have seen many photogs hanging the light from the spigot, should any of the thumb screws be loose the light could fall(however the tether would save it). :eek:

    "IF" you have to mount it parallel to the ground, make sure your spigot has a detent that the thumb screw sinks into when tightened. That helps it from spinning on the spigot and can keep it attached should the thumb screw be loose. I prefer the perpendicular option for reasons mentioned.
    boom_spigot.jpg


     
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  2. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    in the case of the Manfrotto boom arm that JB and I both have, the spigot can be placed into the end of the boom arm in two different orientations. First is the traditional "on the end" positioning of the spigot, and it also offers a "sideways" option , as is shown in JB's photo above. One thing to consider is the size and weight of some of today's larger monolight flashes: back in the 1980s a typical flash head would weigh in at 2.5 to 3.5 pounds, With the powerpack weighing in at up to 28 pounds in the case of big Speedotron power supplies, and typically around 14 or 15 pounds in the case of many medium sized power packs. Today however the flash generation and power storage circuitry has been incorporated into what is known as the monolight flash, and powerful monolights often weigh in at six or seven or eight pounds without modifier added. smaller and lower powered mono light flashes often weigh four pounds or so, Or perhaps five pounds.

    in my opinion if you wish to boom up to 10 pounds, you have moved away from the medium duty and right into the heavy duty boom stand and arm category.
     
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  3. JBPhotog

    JBPhotog No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    For comparison, here is are the two versions of the Manfrotto booms, I own 2 of the 085(one 085B) model and one of the 024. Both are 3-section booms that pack very nicely for location work. The newer version of the 024 is now a 024B with the "B" indicating black anodized finish.

    The specifications are as follows:
    Art: 085B;
    - diameter of the boom arm 35mm
    - load capacity 6kg at maximum extension

    Art: 024B;
    - diameter of the boom arm 25mm
    - load capacity 3kg at maximum extension

    art085_vs_art024.jpg
     
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  4. Nwcid

    Nwcid No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I have 2 of these, 13' Rotatable Boom Light Stand Kit

    Like many things, there are trade offs. They are pretty light and very easy to set up. The controls are smooth and work well. They are relatively inexpensive.

    They are listed as being rated for 10lbs (balanced). I am running AD600's (6.6lb) and a 48" soft box (2.8lb) and you really need to make sure it is balanced well. Also if you have it very high making sure the base is well weighted is a must. They are much more forgiving with AD200's with 24" boxes or other small modifiers.

    These are nice when you have to take them somewhere for a "quick" shoot and do not have a lot of help to pack gear.
     
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