Confused

Discussion in 'Nikon Cameras' started by mickmoonie, Jun 8, 2018.

  1. mickmoonie

    mickmoonie TPF Noob!

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    IMG_0117.JPG IMG_0116.JPG


    Sent from my iPhone using ThePhotoForum.com mobile app. Took this picture today on my D80 on fully auto, what I need to know is why the light area flashes to black and to light please.


     
  2. nerwin

    nerwin Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Its showing the overexposed area.
     
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  3. snowbear

    snowbear fuzzy-wuzzy Supporting Member

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    It's commonly called "the Blinkies." It blinks areas in the photo that are washed out, or way overexposed.
     
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  4. mickmoonie

    mickmoonie TPF Noob!

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  5. snowbear

    snowbear fuzzy-wuzzy Supporting Member

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    Learn to properly expose a photo and which metering mode to use in each situation

    or

    Push the up or down button on the four-way while in photo playback mode.

    Reading the manual is even a bigger help.
     
  6. nerwin

    nerwin Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Overexposing? Well. You can't ALWAYS avoid it. In your picture, the camera exposed for the building properly but since it was either cloudy or the sun was in front of you which caused the sky to be overexposed. To overcome this issue, you can either take multiple bracketed exposures to create an HDR (high dynamic range) or you can wait when the sun is behind you which will allow you exposure for both the sky and the building.

    Make sure you are using Matrix metering as that will try to balance it out.
     
  7. mickmoonie

    mickmoonie TPF Noob!

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    Thanks all for your input, as I'm a DSLR virgin that's the reason I joined this forum, really glad I did. Mickmoonie


    Sent from my iPhone using ThePhotoForum.com mobile app
     
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  8. nerwin

    nerwin Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Just keep practicing and watching YouTube tutorials. You'll get the hang of it.
     
  9. mrca

    mrca No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Two important principles. First, when something is over exposed in digital, there is no information there, just white, and when printing the white of the paper. There is no information to recover in the highlights in post processing. Second, understand your camera may not be able to capture detail in some shots from deep shadows to bright highlights. Therefore, blinkies tell you WHERE you are losing detail in the highlights. The histogram will tell you that detail is being lost in the highlights by stacking up on the right side of the histogram but it doesn't tell you where in the image. If it is a reflection on water, metal or jewelry that is ok to be pure white, no problem, but if it is an important part of the image, you are warned to decrease exposure to rid the blinkies in areas where you want detail.
     
  10. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    mrca has done a good job of summarising things. If you want further help the book Understanding Exposure by Byran Peterson does a good job of explaining things for beginners, along with some good case studies you can practice with.
    That said pretty much any decent photography book will cover the basics of exposure and how to control the exposure. Couple that to your camera manual (which tells you how to control the settings) and you're away!
     
  11. MartinCrabtree

    MartinCrabtree No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I've found over time my D90 will overexpose in overwhelmingly bright conditions when using matrix metering. I compensate -1.0 when out there or when time is available use spot metering and average,i.e basically zone system.
     
  12. Braineack

    Braineack Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    this is when the highlight flashing is helpful.

    it's incredibly difficult to judge an exposure with the LCD display. So having the histogram active on your preview, or the flashing zebra, you can quickly at least judge if your highlight are majorly blown or not.
     

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