Dipping toe in medium format water...help.

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by domromer, Feb 2, 2008.

  1. ThomThomsk

    ThomThomsk TPF Noob!

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    To give an alternative point of view, I chose 645 specifically because I do more landscape than anything else but I needed something relatively portable because I have to walk quite long distances with my equipment. I looked at 6x7s like the Mamiya RB but they are significantly bigger and heavier than the Bronica ETRSi that I ended up with, and at the time were quite a lot more expensive too. 6x6 is no good, for obvious reasons.

    Of course if I were buying now I'd probably get both, because they are all so ridiculously cheap.


     
  2. Helen B

    Helen B TPF Noob!

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    I've always thought that 6x6, 6x7 or 6x9 folders were ideal for landscape work. I used an Autorange 820 for many years before replacing it with a Bessa II. Here's the Bessa II with a new lens:

    [​IMG]

    They are both 6x9 rangefinder cameras with 105 mm lenses. Though the Bessa II generally goes for more than $300 on eBay, there are plenty of other folding cameras. See http://www.certo6.com/ for lots more options.

    Folding MF cameras are much easier to carry than most reflex cameras. Fuji showed a prototype of a 6x7 folder at PMA this year. Hopefully it will go into production.

    There are also the folding Plaubel Makina 6x7 cameras with Nikkor lenses. I have the 67 and W67 and like them very much. Unfortunately parts are getting very hard to find. They still sell for fairly high prices. They are smaller and lighter than my Nikon D3, but are capable of image quality that far surpasses it.

    Best,
    Helen
     
  3. Bill LaMorris

    Bill LaMorris TPF Noob!

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    Try the Mamiya RB 67. They are a great camera and they are inexpensive. I would suggest a storefront opperation like KEH to do buisiness with. They are honest and easy to deal with. You also have someone to complain to if something goes wrong. Or if you like the feel of a 35 mm SLR you could try the PENTAX 67. They are little more expensive to get into, but they are an easy jump from shooting 35`s. Bill
     
  4. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    For $300 or less, you're looking at an RB67 if you want 6x7. It is a very heavy camera, especially if you add a metering prism. A Pentax67 would be preferable, but more expensive.
     
  5. Early

    Early TPF Noob!

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    For the price, you can opt for a Mamiya TLR, either the 330 or the 220. They are light weight with a very smooth shutter, preferable for hand held shots. It is 6X6 format, and takes either 120 or 220 rolls. As with any used camera, just make sure it is guaranteed to work.

    I’ve owned an RB, a 645 Super, a Mamiya 6, and a couple TLR’s, preferring the latter two for handling.
     
  6. CDG

    CDG TPF Noob!

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    It's quite odd to hear me say this, but it really doesn't matter how you start filming with medium format.

    I'd say I was a departure from the herd by buying a Spartus Full Vue camera as my first medium format camera. I still like to shoot it from time to time, but judging the light conditions is pretty much a crapshoot even with a light meter.

    Don't discount a TLR with a handheld light meter. I bought my Ricohflex IIIb for about 15 bucks and an interesting old FirstFlex for about 20 bucks. I put my time in getting them to work again, but to me, it was a worthwhile experience making an old camera rise from the ashes.

    So whether or not this is what you should do, I don't know. That's how I started into MF photography, and it's the only way I shoot to this day. Two vintage TLRs (one loaded with color, the other B&W) with a 3 dollar flexible tripod, vintage $1 light meter rebuilt by your's truly, and a camera bag I dug out of the dumpster behind my dorm room. My light meter really needs an upgrade, but otherwise I couldn't be happier. I'm presently keeping an eye out for a Super Ricohflex as I think it would be more versatile than the IIIb, but right now my money is tied up elsewhere anyway...

    It's not my fault I'm poor :lmao:
     
  7. domromer

    domromer TPF Noob!

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    I ended up getting a rolleicord tlr.

    Hopefully I'll have some scans to post this week.
     
  8. nealjpage

    nealjpage multi format master in a film geek package

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    I'm glad you had fun with that Rollei. They're so fun to use AND people like to talk about them.

    Now go shoot that Hassy!
     

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