Extention tube or lens mount with manual aperture control

Discussion in 'Nikon Lenses' started by crimbfighter, Feb 15, 2016.

  1. crimbfighter

    crimbfighter TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Does anyone know of either a lens mount or extension tube for Nikon lenses that has manual aperture control built in? I want to be able to use my G series macro lens on my bellows, but I can't since I have no manual control over the aperture.


     
  2. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    I looked around on the web for 10 minutes or so. I thought Novoflex might have something. I went through a huge listing of their offerings but didn't see anything for Nikon.

    I did not look through the Fotodiox site--they would be a potential source for an adapter; they DO SELL the Nikon F lens adapter to Canon EF mount adapter for around a hundred dollars; I own one, it is their deluxe adapter, and it has a manually, hand-operated mechanical controlling system that sets the Nikon G-=series lenses to one of seven different closely click-tabbed aperture sizes. The settings are unmarked, and I just count the clicks. Of course, the back end of that is a CANON mount. Since you're using it on a bellows, perhaps there could also be a second adapter added, Canon EOS to Nikon F, to mate to the front of the bellows.

    Used with a G-series lens mounted in reverse, the Fotodiox G-series adapter would control the lens's iris from the very front of the rig.

    If you really need a bellows, then you need a bellows. The Kenko AF tubes, set of three, control f/stop and keep AF and keep EXIF reporting and TTL control using Nikkor G-series lenses, so that would be one option. It's a three-ring set with something like 13mm, 20mm, and 36mm tubes, so it does offer quite a lot of extension, but it is, of course, not as flexible as a bellows.
     
  3. crimbfighter

    crimbfighter TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Thanks for the reply. I have the Kenko extension tubes, and they're quite useful. However, with the 105mm macro they only get me to 1.74:1. I can get to almost 2.5:1 with my bellows, and it has the added benefit of being mounted to a focus rail for those super fine adjustments or focus stacking.

    I hadn't thought about mounting it in reverse and controlling the aperture with a fotodiox adapter. Loosing the ability to focus with the lens wouldnt be much of an issue since i can focus with the focusing rail. I did look at those adapters, but then noticed they were nikon to canon, nikon to sony, etc. That certainly would be an option. I also like the thought of simply adding a Canon to Nikon adapter to the stack. Definitely a couple viable options if I can't find a purpose built solution. Thanks for the ideas.
     
  4. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    How about adding a short focal length lens mounted in reverse orientation, to the front filter threads of the 105mm macro lens, using a lens reversing ring? That could get you higher magnification, plus the wide-angle lens could be almost "anything", even an old obsolete mount like Canon FD or Minolta manual focus or...Konica...or whatnot?
     
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  5. 480sparky

    480sparky Chief Free Electron Relocator Supporting Member

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    Manual focus lenses with aperture rings are very inexpensive these days. With a bellows, using a dedicated macro lens really isn't required. You can get about any lens with an aperture ring to work. I normally use a pre-Ai 28mm Nikkor on my bellows.

    Some Nikon bellows have the aperture control built into them. Or you can reverse just about any lens you want with the right filter-thread-to-F-mount adapter.
     
  6. crimbfighter

    crimbfighter TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    That's a thought. Though I was hoping to make the least complicated setup I could with the bellows..

    Thanks for the reply. I wish my bellows had that... I actually have a 55mm f/3.5 lens that I had AI converted for use on my D800 and it is a nice little lens. I've used it reversed on my bellows a few times. The main reason I want to be using my 105mm is for the working distance.
     

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