HDR Video

Discussion in 'HDR Discussions' started by Watchful, Mar 18, 2016.

  1. Watchful

    Watchful No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I am waiting patiently for HDR video screens to be released to the public, especially the ones being done by Dolby Labs.
    I have done some testing, but I want one that I own. :)


     
  2. Wasp1

    Wasp1 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I have had a play with it but believe me I'm am not to sure how to go about it and I plan on a Youtube later today to find out more on this.
    As I think I can get close to the same results in Photoshop. But my tiny brain is not fully understanding the HDR thing fully. So I could be so wrong on this to.
     
  3. Watchful

    Watchful No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    HDR in video is not like HDR in photographs. For a photo you just snap 3 shots of the same scene with 3 different exposures and process the highlight of the underexposure, the mids of the normal and the shadows of the over exposed shot into a single shot. In video, you just increase the brightness of the very brightest areas dramatically. The rest of the scene retains it's colors better due to not being washed out by the brights.
    As an example the Samsung JS9500 reaches 1000 nits and Dolby labs is working on a system that is capable of 4000 nits. The other important feature, besides brighter whites and darker blacks is 10 bit color.
    Some of the players in this emerging tech are advocating 16 bit color. So, truer colors, 4k resolution and super high contrast and extreme brightness of white light.

    HDR TV: What is it and should you care?
     

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