Home Studio Kits - any advice?

Mike380

TPF Noob!
Joined
Dec 24, 2005
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Location
Watford, UK
Hi all,

I was thinking of purchasing some form of a home studio kit as I'm really into starting portfolio/personal photoshoot photography. I currently own a Canon 300D and was wondering if anyone could give me any advice on what sort of kit to buy? I'm assuming these kits can be hooked up to the 300D in some way (not quite sure how)??

Mike
 

Big Mike

I am Big, I am Mike
Staff member
Supporting Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2003
Messages
33,900
Reaction score
1,863
Location
Edmonton
Website
www.mikehodson.ca
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
Welcome to the forum.

A lot of people seem to recommend Alien Bee lights & kits (for beginners anyway). They are inexpensive but perhaps lack the durability of more expensive lights. Check them out here

I don't remember for sure, but I don't think the 300D had a PC socket. That is the plug that is usually used to connect to studio lights. There is an adapter that you can buy, that goes into your hot-shoe and has a PC socket. Something like this
 

ajmall

TPF Noob!
Joined
Mar 24, 2004
Messages
656
Reaction score
0
Location
Leicester, UK
Website
www.photodrew.co.uk
If you're looking at a long term investment then it's worth spending the extra cash on some elinchrom or bowens lights. I'll be getting some bowens myself in the next few days as long as i can pick which ones i want!

With studio lights, you really do get what you pay for. Alien Bees are only available in the States so you won't be able to get them unless u airmail them...

"Calumet" are a good store chain to ask advice from though if you do go for some bowens, warehouseexpress.com have competitive prices.
 

Alpha

Troll Extraordinaire
Joined
Mar 15, 2005
Messages
5,454
Reaction score
41
Location
San Francisco
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
I honestly don't mean to hijack the thread here, because my original intention was to suggest that you buy some vintage tungsten lights, which are very cheap to come by and extremely durable, but could somebody please explain the point of setting off several giant shaded strobes as opposed to constant light? I mean doesn't that take all the guess work out of shadows and everything without having to use a polaroid back? I guess if you're shooting digital it isn't that big of a deal, but for us film users, why stobe over constant lighting?
 

hobbes28

Incredible
Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2004
Messages
4,807
Reaction score
42
Location
at work...
Website
www.fatephoto.com
For us, it comes down to heat produced. If you take a lot of lights in a room and have them on constantly, it gets hot in the small areas in which we generally shoot. For some, it works fine, but I've noticed when we use the lights on full contstant lights, it gets very warm in a short amount of time.
 

Big Mike

I am Big, I am Mike
Staff member
Supporting Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2003
Messages
33,900
Reaction score
1,863
Location
Edmonton
Website
www.mikehodson.ca
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
MaxBloom said:
I honestly don't mean to hijack the thread here, because my original intention was to suggest that you buy some vintage tungsten lights, which are very cheap to come by and extremely durable, but could somebody please explain the point of setting off several giant shaded strobes as opposed to constant light? I mean doesn't that take all the guess work out of shadows and everything without having to use a polaroid back? I guess if you're shooting digital it isn't that big of a deal, but for us film users, why stobe over constant lighting?

Most studio strobes have modeling lights. So that takes a lot out of the guess work.
 
OP
M

Mike380

TPF Noob!
Joined
Dec 24, 2005
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Location
Watford, UK
steve817 said:
Mike380, Have you ever worked with studio lights before?

I had a go with some studio lights a few months ago with someone elses equipment, but I've never used them for myself with my own equipment. I'm completly clueless at the moment on what to buy, what connections I'm going to need and what software I'm going to need also.
 

Rob

TPF Noob!
Joined
Jan 29, 2005
Messages
6,217
Reaction score
134
Location
London
Website
www.ukphotographs.com
You can't go wrong with Bowens, if you can afford it. One of their kits should contain everything you need, except a trigger lead. You can wire your hot show directly into the kit with a trigger lead, or you can use the onboard flash to trigger.

Have a look at their site and have a think about your budget:
http://www.bowens.co.uk/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=259

Rob
 

steve817

TPF Noob!
Joined
Oct 13, 2003
Messages
537
Reaction score
0
Location
Arlington Texas
Mike380 said:
I had a go with some studio lights a few months ago with someone elses equipment, but I've never used them for myself with my own equipment. I'm completly clueless at the moment on what to buy, what connections I'm going to need and what software I'm going to need also.


Given that I would suggest starting off with one good light and some reflectors, maybe one of those 5 in one jobs. Monolights are to me much easier ti deal with since the power pack is already self contained. A goos meter is not needed but will make your much much much easier.

I have an Alien Bees 800 and I like it, but there are some things I would change about it if I could.

#1 The modeling light is only 100 or 150 watts I can't remember. When shooting somewhere where the is quite a bit of ambient light, it make it a little more difficult to see the shadows. I would look for some thing with a 250 modeling lamp

#2 Although I yet yet to experience it. I hear they get a little squirrely at the lower end of the power settings.
 

Most reactions

New Topics

Top