How to upload and edit my RAW photos without losing photo quality

mollyfreemanL

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When I upload my RAW photos to my computer, why does it lose its picture quality? I would like to know how to edit my RAW photos without losing the picture quality. I’ve tried editing on GIMP but it will lose picture quality.
 
Raw files don't lose image quality. However, the photos from them might look bland compared to the JPGs which are usually souped up quite a lot by the camera (depending on the settings).

It is up to the user to edit the RAWs to their liking. That is what RAW editors are for.
 
On modern cameras, the image you see on the back of the camera is usually a JPEG camera processor pepped up image. I had this same thing a couple of years ago when I first started doing photography, I'd look at my RAW on the computer and think 'that's not the image I took...'
 
You can't see a raw file on your computer. It MUST be processed into a JPEG or PNG. So whatever method is being used on the raw data to produce the image you actually see is causing the issue.
 
If you like what you see on the camera's screen, shoot in jpeg and forget raw. YOu can still fine-tune jpeg files although not to the same extent as raw. But jpeg is good enough for most people.
 
How lame is it that I hoped no one would answer this the original posters question correctly :p

Am I right in thinking that Gimp creates a jpg after a converting a raw file? That happens with most image editing tools. They open a raw file but convert to a jpg or tiff or some other format. I believe Gimp has it's own native format right? In photoshop it's a psd file.
 
AFAIK, Gimp doesn't do any raw format.

Gimp does have a native .xcf format, but that's not a raw image format.
 
AFAIK, Gimp doesn't do any raw format.

Gimp does have a native .xcf format, but that's not a raw image format.
.Tiff files are losseless image files. Right up to 32 bit. I don't know of any camera he's likely to use that goes beyond 16 bit raw.
 
.Tiff files are losseless image files. Right up to 32 bit. I don't know of any camera he's likely to use that goes beyond 16 bit raw.

Are there any cameras that shoot .TIF though?
 
Are there any cameras that shoot .TIF though?
Sure there are. I even remember a medium format camera that had the option to shoot 16 bit .Tif files.

That's not what I mean though. When you open up your raw image and convert it to the next format chose a .Tif file. Window's renders a thumbnail for them so it's easier to view in windows explorer. Raw to .Tif losseless where's the harm in that.
 
Unless the OP has a camera that shoots TIF, then it's all a moot point now.
 
Unless the OP has a camera that shoots TIF, then it's all a moot point now.
No that's wrong. LOL. If he opens his raw and then saves it has a 32 bit .tif file, he should be able to open it again and again without losing quality....

I mean s/he can't lose quality by opening the same raw file over and over again right?


Assuming the "Noob" is opening the raw file and saving it as a jpg.
 
When a raw converter app like GIMP or Lightroom opens a raw file, it does not create a JPG or TIFF. It just converts the raw file to an image in memory.

The user then can edit that image, and when ready, export the image as a file in a format chosen by the user - JPG or TIFF or other.

The OP has not been seen since a few minutes after posting the first post, and is not benefitting from the wisdom in all the replies.
 

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