made a custom DIY small softbox for my speedlight

Discussion in 'Lighting and Hardware' started by matthewo, Mar 6, 2012.

  1. matthewo

    matthewo Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2011
    Messages:
    1,445
    Likes Received:
    646
    Location:
    the south
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    i didnt want to spend money on one of those softboxs you can put on your speed light so i made one myself just to see if it was even worth having. it actually does work decently. i used cardboard and two layers of wax paper, along with reflective foil. on both sides. i may spray the whole outside with plasti dip, to give it a black coating.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


     
  2. Tee

    Tee Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2010
    Messages:
    1,954
    Likes Received:
    620
    Location:
    South central PA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Fun! How are the results?
     
  3. 2WheelPhoto

    2WheelPhoto TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2011
    Messages:
    6,844
    Likes Received:
    994
    Location:
    Tampa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Nice !
     
  4. matthewo

    matthewo Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2011
    Messages:
    1,445
    Likes Received:
    646
    Location:
    the south
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    it works pretty good. the sb-24 isnt the best flash for upclose photography cause it only goes down to 1/16th power, but works fine at subjects 5 or more feet away. i will end up just using two sb-24s and using them as off camera flashes on a lightstand with a large softbox or umbrellas, with wireless triggers. but for right now this little softbox does help a little. not bad for free.

    seemed to work really good at 1/16th power at 6 feet with the flash directed right at the subject.
     
  5. matthewo

    matthewo Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2011
    Messages:
    1,445
    Likes Received:
    646
    Location:
    the south
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    i know im using lower end flashes and lighting that can be picked up cheap. i paid $65 for the sb-24 and i love it, its a great manual flash, i wish it went a little softer, but its not going to be a problem, i know i will probably never need any less then 1/16th when properly used behind an umbrella or in a large softbox.

    IMO, i would rather spend my money on good lenses, and camera bodies. cause a $65 sb-24, is going to perform just as good as a $325 sb-700 as a manual off camera flash. i would much rather just manually set my power levels on the off camera flashes and fire away. i will still probably buy one sb-700 for an oncamera flash.
     
  6. Mach0

    Mach0 TPF Supporters Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2011
    Messages:
    2,616
    Likes Received:
    430
    Location:
    203
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I have one as well as the sb28. I kinda like the fact that the sb28 goes down to 1/64th. Not bad. I personally don't use it that low but can see a benefit. Plus its smaller if you ever need to mount it on camera.
     
  7. matthewo

    matthewo Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2011
    Messages:
    1,445
    Likes Received:
    646
    Location:
    the south
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    i may buy a sb-28 then instead of another 24. would be nice to have the extra adjustablity. the 28s are pretty much the same price anyways.
     
  8. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2003
    Messages:
    33,901
    Likes Received:
    1,862
    Location:
    Edmonton
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit


    At much more than 5 feet, you won't get much softening from this.

    Remember that to make light softer, you need to enlarge the light source, relative to the subject. So the farther away the subject is from the light, the larger the light source has to be.
     

Share This Page