Memory card

k5MOW

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Good morning everyone

I am using a Nikon D5300 and wanted all of your opinion on a good quality memory card that works good with the Nikon cameras. I don't want to spend a huge amount of money but would like a decent memory card probably in the 30 or $40 range.

Thanks Roger
 
SAnDisk

It all depends upon what amount of storage you want.
and how fast of a card you want.

for instance
a "faster" card is better if you shoot any sports and use Continuous High as it will clear the buffer of the camera faster. Though these cost more.

Also, there's 8 gigabyte, 16, 32, 64 gb + options.


For instance, at Bestbuy today on sale
- slow card
is a "standard" 16GB card for $9.99 - regular $29.99

- faster general card
an "Ultra" 8GB 30mb card is $11.99 - regular $24.99

- fast card
an "Extreme Plus" 32 GB 80mbps card is $17.99 regular $79.99

- really fast card
an "Extreme Pro" 32GB, 95gbps card is $39.99 - regular $99.99

so .. go to BestBuy.com and buy some cards while they are on sale !!
 
Amazon currently has the SanDisk 32gb Ultra 80mb/s Class 10 cards for $9.98 for cyber Monday!

I ended up picking up a few Extreme Pro's for stocking stuffers....and maybe one or two for myself haha
 
Lexar Professional and SanDisk Extreme + are all I use. Whichever is on sale is the "best".
 
You're right, SanDisk ideal combination of quality and price. I would like to clarify: the quality higher of prices :)
 
Some notes about DSLR cameras and memory cards.

A lot of memory cards can accept data at a write to rate higher than the camera image file buffer can transfer the data.
In other words the camera's internal memory buffer is likely going to be the transfer speed limiting factor.

Memory card makers usually rely on a memory card's Read speed for advertising purposes rather than the memory card's Write speed, which is typically quite a bit slower than the read speed.
So evaluate if this or that memory card can empty the camera image file buffer at a rate equal to or faster than the camera image file buffer can move the data files.

The more memory the card has, the greater the potential for lost images.
In that regard many photographers opt for several memory cards of less capacity each over 1 monster capacity memory card that if it failed could wipe out 100's, if not 1000's of photo image files stored on the card.

Back in the day it was a major blow to discover a 36 exposure roll of film that had 36 photos on it was no good for 1 reason or another.
I cringe when I think of losing 250 or so Raw image and/or video files on just one of the multiple 8 GB memory cards I use.

I would not want to deal with losing, due to card failure, as many image/video files as a 32 GB or bigger memory card can hold.

"Plan for the worst. Hope for the best."
 
I am also surprised by the fall in prices on storage))) A month ago, I took Sanisk 32 GB for $ 50:adoration:
 
Sandisk or Lexar, it may be worth checking your cameras write speed and getting one that will match it. Bear in mind that read speeds are faster, and that's the figure that manufacurers tend to quote so you may have to do a bit of digging to find out what the write speeds are.
 
SANDISK is also my choice. I have them over a decade old that still work fine, although they are of puny capacity by todays standards.
 
Some notes about DSLR cameras and memory cards.

A lot of memory cards can accept data at a write to rate higher than the camera image file buffer can transfer the data.
In other words the camera's internal memory buffer is likely going to be the transfer speed limiting factor.

Memory card makers usually rely on a memory card's Read speed for advertising purposes rather than the memory card's Write speed, which is typically quite a bit slower than the read speed.
So evaluate if this or that memory card can empty the camera image file buffer at a rate equal to or faster than the camera image file buffer can move the data files.

The more memory the card has, the greater the potential for lost images.
In that regard many photographers opt for several memory cards of less capacity each over 1 monster capacity memory card that if it failed could wipe out 100's, if not 1000's of photo image files stored on the card.

Back in the day it was a major blow to discover a 36 exposure roll of film that had 36 photos on it was no good for 1 reason or another.
I cringe when I think of losing 250 or so Raw image and/or video files on just one of the multiple 8 GB memory cards I use.

I would not want to deal with losing, due to card failure, as many image/video files as a 32 GB or bigger memory card can hold.

"Plan for the worst. Hope for the best."


I agree with all of the above and below is my standard answer to this question.

1) What type of pictures do you normally take.
2) Are you going to regularly shooting in burst/ high speed continuous , at motorsport or some such thing were speed involved.
3) Is it more important to have pictures to be uploaded to your PC fast over having them saved to the memory card quickly after taking them.
4) Do you shoot in RAW or Jpeg.
5) What is the buffer capability of your camera. ( Important but I wouldn't worry about it)


Now what to look out for in the shop:
Capacity --- (GB)
What is the cards Read speed --- (Mbs)
What is the cards Write speed --- (Mbs)

You can get cards of all capacities 8, 16, 32 and so on, I prefer to have a few medium capacity rather then one big one because there cheaper to replace if you loss them plus it handy to have spare rather then relying on 1 and when a very large card is wedged full of raw files you will curse yourself.

Often card makers market there memory cards with a number displayed in big text on the front of the pack, something like 40Mbs. This number mostly is what is known as the READ speed which means how fast data stored on the card will be downloaded to your PC. Thus the data from our example will be taking from your memory card and put onto your computer at a rate of 40 megabits per second.

Write Speed: This is how fast image data can be transferred from your cameras buffer to the memory card the higher this number the faster the camera is ready to take the next shot. Your buffer capacity comes into play here as the card can only save the stuff as quick as the camera makes it. But worst case scenario I rather have a something thats more than capable over cant cope.
(Unlike your standard card which deceptively quotes read speed on the front there is normally a ultra or extreme reference made but double check the specs regardless to be sure)

This is an example of more than capable/ overkill
I use SanDisk Extreme Pro class 10 95MB/S in 16 GB in both D3100 and D90.

A memory card with the below specs would be fine for normal use. Price looks like sharp practise but I havent bought one in some time. If it was me the saving on the extreme 32 GB would sway me.

- faster general card
an "Ultra" 8GB 30mb card is $11.99 - regular $24.99

- fast card
an "Extreme Plus" 32 GB 80mbps card is $17.99 regular $79.99
 
I use the cards mentioned earlier because they were on sale at a ridiculously low price. I'll live with the overkill.
 

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