mirrorless vs dslr

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by hazardo, Nov 7, 2015.

  1. hazardo

    hazardo TPF Noob!

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    Between the sony alpha a5000 and the nikon d3200 which one takes the best shots?


     
  2. Ysarex

    Ysarex Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    The Nikon, but not because it has a mirror. The Nikon has a professional line of lenses available -- lenses take photos.

    Joe
     
  3. PropilotBW

    PropilotBW Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Not really a fan of Sony, but pretty sure they have some decent options that an a5000 shooter would be interested in.

    Compare the Nikon D3200 vs the Sony Alpha A5000
     
  4. dxqcanada

    dxqcanada Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    One thing that has been mentioned ... you really have to consider if the Sony e-mount offers the lenses that you want.
    There are many wide/mid angle lenses ... but it can be pricey but there are many high IQ lenses available.
    Though many adapt other brand lenses to the e-mount ... but that kinda defeats the purpose of such a compact camera.

    I have a NEX-6 ... and being a wildlife photographer, it is not an option because of the lack of long focal lengths ... still, I have got some great IQ out of this older model using a-mount lenses (using the LA-EA2).
     
  5. snowbear

    snowbear fuzzy-wuzzy Supporting Member

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    It will depend, in part, on the photographer. If the shooter isn't worth a darn, it really won't matter which camera is in use.
     
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  6. goodguy

    goodguy Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Nikon D3200
     
  7. soufiej

    soufiej No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    You take the shot after you have framed the shot in the viewfinder as you have visualized it in your mind. The camera only responds to your input. Look around, people are taking really outstanding photos with their phones and with $100 compacts. The camera is completely secondary.



    You have reduced this to a single value. Nothing in life is a single value other than a return to the stuff we are made of is inevitable.

    Is this your first camera? Your first "pro-sumer" camera?

    If you have owned a DSLR prior to this, you probably have a selection of lenses and accessories in your present kit. If so, are you looking to ditch all of that?

    Have you considered what "best shots" actually involves? Resolution of data points? Color mapping? Lack or inclusion of anti-aliasing filters? Etc, etc, etc.

    If you are shooting fast action, then make that a criteria of your decision. Fast focus is not always a feature people need but, if it's not there when you want it, you'll be disappointed and you'll have missed the opportunity.

    Menus? Many users feel the Sony menus are rather confused and somewhat difficult to manipulate. Nikon has been at this for decades and their menus are about as good as they get. Even a Sony user can navigate a Nikon menu. The same can't be said for the other way 'round. If you can't get to the functions and features of the camera, then the camera still controls you and you might as well be using a point and shoot.

    Nikon clearly has the advantage when it comes to lens and accessory selection. If you are still a student of photography, you will find more tutorials and tips available for any specific Nikon camera than you will for a Sony.

    Are you traveling? If so, how is each line represented in the areas you will be working from?

    How broad are your photographic interests? If you want to go from macro to landscapes to astro-photography, then choosing the line with the greatest number of lenses and accessories will be to your advantage.

    If you are only looking to snap staged shots of the kids in the park, it's virtually a wash. If, that is, you are shooting in RAW capture and perfecting your photos in post production.

    If the camera is going to be used for social media, take into account how each line handles their Jpeg processing. Jpegs come out of the camera already baked and you only have to apply a bit of jam to finish them off. There are, however, considerable differences between the Sony and the Nikon Jpeg ovens and, therefore, the results each will turn out are vastly dissimilar. Determine your use and that will lead you toward your best selection.

    If you intend to use the camera with social media, determine the functionality of each camera's ability to connect to the internet. For many of us, this is a totally useless feature we wish was never included with our cameras. But, as with fast focus, if you need the feature, you want the feature to work and work without a lot of cursing to achieve the end.

    Broaden your viewpoint and you will likely answer your own question.

    Then head to your local camera shop and handle each camera. And, if you shop local, buy local. Most local shops will compete with legitimate on line pricing so don't use the local shop simply for an audition and then head off to buy from someone who may be working out of their garage offering to save you a few dollars. If it is too good to be true, it generally isn't true. If you are unfamiliar with the term "grey market goods", do your research before you hand over your cash.
     

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