Nikon Camera Lens Tools for disassembly and assembly question

Lonnie1212

No longer a newbie, moving up!
Joined
Sep 17, 2019
Messages
409
Reaction score
112
Location
Springfield, Illinois
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
Hi Folks,

I have been watching people disassemble old Nikon lenses on YouTube. I want to give it a try. But I need a smaller screwdriver set. I have a jewelers screwdriver set. But there is a screw in a 50mm Nikkor lens that is smaller than I have ever seen. Can anyone recommend a screwdriver set that would have that small of a driver? I thought I had seen about everything in the size of screws. But this one is very micro size.

Thank you,

Lonnie
 

Warfarin

No longer a newbie, moving up!
Joined
Aug 7, 2021
Messages
209
Reaction score
96
Location
Utah
Can others edit my Photos
Photos OK to edit
Bump. I would like an answer to this as well. With all the old repair guys retiring I thought I would give it a go.
 

Soocom1

Been spending a lot of time on here!
Joined
Feb 27, 2006
Messages
3,081
Reaction score
1,350
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
Keep in mind that most of those screws are metric and a standard Philips is not wise.

You need a JIS set for those screws. (Japan International Standard). They are different and a regular Philips can tear the hell out of them.
Also learn about the various assembly means.
 
OP
Lonnie1212

Lonnie1212

No longer a newbie, moving up!
Joined
Sep 17, 2019
Messages
409
Reaction score
112
Location
Springfield, Illinois
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
Thank you for the responses. I will keep these things in mind.
 

480sparky

Chief Free Electron Relocator
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2011
Messages
24,921
Reaction score
8,883
Location
Iowa
Website
pixels.com
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
JIS is the way to go.
 

P.giannakis

No longer a newbie, moving up!
Joined
Mar 7, 2022
Messages
74
Reaction score
185
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
Depending on what is your plan, you might need more than screwdrivers - you might need friction tools and lens pliers. Very often Nikon applied a screw locking cement on screws so you might require a soldering iron to warm the screws up before trying to unscrew them (or apply a solvent on the screw).

I would say, try disassembling a cheap lens before giving a Nikkor a try. It is not as easy as it might seem on youtube videos.
 
OP
Lonnie1212

Lonnie1212

No longer a newbie, moving up!
Joined
Sep 17, 2019
Messages
409
Reaction score
112
Location
Springfield, Illinois
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
Depending on what is your plan, you might need more than screwdrivers - you might need friction tools and lens pliers. Very often Nikon applied a screw locking cement on screws so you might require a soldering iron to warm the screws up before trying to unscrew them (or apply a solvent on the screw).

I would say, try disassembling a cheap lens before giving a Nikkor a try. It is not as easy as it might seem on youtube videos.

Good advice! I may intentionally buy some junk lenses just to practice with. I have seen those friction tools and lens pliers around. Knowing how to repair lenses would be a good racket to get into. But I have other things going on in life now.
 

ac12

Been spending a lot of time on here!
Joined
Dec 5, 2017
Messages
2,473
Reaction score
818
Location
SF Bay Area, California, USA
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
The "problem" comes when you separate the lens elements groups.
When you assemble it, HOW do you know you have the elements in the EXACTLY correct position?
To me, that is impossible, without an optical bench.
So, be careful how far down you disassemble the lens.

Tips
When you unscrew a lens helical, MARK where it separates.
So that when you assemble the lens, you have a reference point to align to.
Been there, done that. On an old manual focus lenses, I assembled it, but the assembly was 180 degrees off :eek-73:

Get a visor magnifier, if your eyes are anywhere as bad as mine.

Put a white towel on your bench, so that a dropped part won't bounce, and so you can find parts that you drop.
And work in a room with a SOLID floor, not carpet. If a small part drop onto carpet, good luck finding it.

I use an egg carton to put the parts of what I am disassembling. Each position is used to put a different set of parts. That makes it easier to find the parts I need, when I reassemble it.
And glue the egg carton to a piece of wood, so it is harder to flip over. Been there, done that too.

Take LOTS of pictures and notes as you disassemble the lens.
It is the old joke about having parts left over after you assemble the item.
The longer the time between disassembly and reassembly, the more you will forget the details.
 

compur

Been spending a lot of time on here!
Joined
Mar 6, 2008
Messages
3,942
Reaction score
880
Location
L.A.
The Vessel JIS screwdriver set is a popular choice for working on Japanese cameras and lenses. Get the precision set that has 4 cross-point sizes:

TD-56S

Don't use "Phillips" screwdrivers on Japanese products.
 

dxqcanada

Been spending a lot of time on here!
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
Messages
7,696
Reaction score
1,585
Location
Woodbridge, Ontario, Canada
Can others edit my Photos
Photos OK to edit
If you have watched Nikon videos I am going to guess it was Richard Haw ... he is in the FB group.
 
OP
Lonnie1212

Lonnie1212

No longer a newbie, moving up!
Joined
Sep 17, 2019
Messages
409
Reaction score
112
Location
Springfield, Illinois
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
The "problem" comes when you separate the lens elements groups.
When you assemble it, HOW do you know you have the elements in the EXACTLY correct position?
To me, that is impossible, without an optical bench.
So, be careful how far down you disassemble the lens.

Tips
When you unscrew a lens helical, MARK where it separates.
So that when you assemble the lens, you have a reference point to align to.
Been there, done that. On an old manual focus lenses, I assembled it, but the assembly was 180 degrees off :eek-73:

Get a visor magnifier, if your eyes are anywhere as bad as mine.

Put a white towel on your bench, so that a dropped part won't bounce, and so you can find parts that you drop.
And work in a room with a SOLID floor, not carpet. If a small part drop onto carpet, good luck finding it.

I use an egg carton to put the parts of what I am disassembling. Each position is used to put a different set of parts. That makes it easier to find the parts I need, when I reassemble it.
And glue the egg carton to a piece of wood, so it is harder to flip over. Been there, done that too.

Take LOTS of pictures and notes as you disassemble the lens.
It is the old joke about having parts left over after you assemble the item.
The longer the time between disassembly and reassembly, the more you will forget the details.
Sounds like good advice. Thank you
 
OP
Lonnie1212

Lonnie1212

No longer a newbie, moving up!
Joined
Sep 17, 2019
Messages
409
Reaction score
112
Location
Springfield, Illinois
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
The "problem" comes when you separate the lens elements groups.
When you assemble it, HOW do you know you have the elements in the EXACTLY correct position?
To me, that is impossible, without an optical bench.
So, be careful how far down you disassemble the lens.

Tips
When you unscrew a lens helical, MARK where it separates.
So that when you assemble the lens, you have a reference point to align to.
Been there, done that. On an old manual focus lenses, I assembled it, but the assembly was 180 degrees off :eek-73:

Get a visor magnifier, if your eyes are anywhere as bad as mine.

Put a white towel on your bench, so that a dropped part won't bounce, and so you can find parts that you drop.
And work in a room with a SOLID floor, not carpet. If a small part drop onto carpet, good luck finding it.

I use an egg carton to put the parts of what I am disassembling. Each position is used to put a different set of parts. That makes it easier to find the parts I need, when I reassemble it.
And glue the egg carton to a piece of wood, so it is harder to flip over. Been there, done that too.

Take LOTS of pictures and notes as you disassemble the lens.
It is the old joke about having parts left over after you assemble the item.
The longer the time between disassembly and reassembly, the more you will forget the details.
Sounds like good advice from someone with a lot of experience.
 

Most reactions

ClickASnap
Top