Old Box Camera Identification?

Discussion in 'Collector's Corner' started by Shiro, May 14, 2018.

  1. Shiro

    Shiro TPF Noob!

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    IMG_0776.JPG IMG_0777.JPG IMG_0779.JPG IMG_0780.JPG Hi guys, I'm rather new to the camera collecting scene. I was very happy to find what I thought was a Brownie No. 2 in an antique shop down the way and was looking forward to shooting some pictures with it. However, when I got the camera home, it seems that the camera isn't a Brownie at all. I would appreciate it if anyone could help me identify it. :)


     
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  2. webestang64

    webestang64 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I was thinking Agfa but they would have their name inside the door. Could be a generic brand as they popped up right after Kodak came out with the box camera in 1889 (Brownie came out in 1900).
    I'm not sure if this camera you show is a roll film camera, the looks of the door make me think it could be a "shoot one negative at a time".
     
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  3. Mitica100

    Mitica100 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    It's hard to tell without seeing it in person, it could be an Ansco. Some of their box cameras had a little brassy rectangle with the brand name on it right below the taking lens. Also, some had identification on the leather handle, which seems to be missing from yours.
     
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  4. vintagesnaps

    vintagesnaps Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Interesting. That's a thought, that the name could've been on the handle. The metal latch to me is unusual, and the viewing windows are so tiny I wonder if it's a fairly early one. And who needs an actual lens? lol there's a shutter, what more could you need?

    edit - Didn't post yet, was looking up websites I've used.
    Box Cameras - Antique and Vintage Cameras
    Antique and Classic Cameras
    James's Camera Retirement Home

    It occurred to me that I didn't see a knob to turn to advance film, so webestang's probably right. You could probably do some pinhole shots with it, or look up Ilford's so-called large format annual... thing, where they take orders for not just large format but smaller odd sized sheet films too.

    This thing - ULF, I couldn't think of the name of it, but realized it's this time of year (and I see there's only about 10 days left). You can look up dealers where you can place an order.
    ILFORD Photo ULF and custom film size manufacture 2018 - Ilford Photo
     
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  5. Mitica100

    Mitica100 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Now that you mention the lack of a knob, I'm leaning towards a plate box camera, early 1900s. Very cool.
     
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  6. vintagesnaps

    vintagesnaps Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I was wondering that too, if it took plates. Maybe it could be adapted for sheet firm? Or make a tintype!?! Or use Ilford/Harman Direct Positive paper and expose it for, I don't know, a day and a half? The ISO is like, 3. OK seriously, Ilford has a data sheet, maybe 1-2 minutes in sun up to 10 min. if it's cloudy.
     
  7. webestang64

    webestang64 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    And looks like there is a gap at the top when it's shut?

     
  8. Mitica100

    Mitica100 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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  9. compur

    compur Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I believe it is a film pack camera such as a Kodak Premo Jr or Film Pack Hawkeye, etc.

    They take Kodak 520 Film Packs which contains 12 thin film sheets with a paper tab at the top. The slot at the top rear of the camera is where the tabs peek out. After shooting you pull the tab to rotate that sheet to the back of the pack.

    [​IMG]

    See this too:
    Premo Junior - Camera-wiki.org - The free camera encyclopedia
     
  10. Shiro

    Shiro TPF Noob!

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    Hey guys, thanks for all your information! Along with what compur said, it turns out this camera is a Kodak Premo Jr No. 1 Model B. They were apparently produced between 1908- 1922. Once again, thanks for the info! Definitely a cool find! :)
     

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