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Photographic Children

jonathon94

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I have just recently received a Canon T3 and I would like to start taking action photography but at the moment most high school sports are not going on. I do believe there are some rec sports going on during this season (though I haven't looked into it to be sure) I want to go to try out action photography and honestly I think rec is usually best because it is less popular so less restrictions on where fans can stand and less people to dodge but of course my biggest issue is that it's mostly children below 12 of age. Although I am only 17, I feel that if I show up with a camera to a game with nothing but kids they will take me as a pervert and I'd rather not deal with explaining to the police that I'm only photographing little kids for photography practice.

So any suggestions, or just don't go and wait for High School Football season (the most popular sport around here)
 
As long as you're not leering at them and waving candy in their faces you shouldn't have any problems.

All kidding aside, talk to the coach ahead of time and make sure they're cool with it, which they most likely will be. If one of the parents should approach you, tell them exactly why you're there. And if you are really ambitious - and I highly recommend doing this - take the photos with the intent of posting them online, and get either the email address of the coach, or one of the parents. Once you get them posted, email them the link, and have them email it to all the other parents. They'll be thrilled. Trust me. I shoot school sports all the time. Parents LOVE pics of their children, and they'll love you for taking them. Not only that, it'll really help develop your photography skills. Good luck.
 
As a mother I can say you will probably be fine. I would have little cards with your flickr site on them and let parents know you are an aspiring photographer and they can view the photos you take on your website.
 
In my personal experience, waving around a "big fancy camera" will allow you more freedom. If you have a DSLR people won't think much about it because they're assuming your a professional/artist. At least, that's my personal experience.
 
You should be fine. Just be professional and courteous. If you look like you're doing something wrong, parents are going to assume you're doing something wrong.
 
Showing up with a camera and taking pictures of kids under the age of 18 without the permisson of the parents is going to cause you problems. Regardless of how innocent you are, people these days are so parinoid about anyone with a camera. Your best bet is to talk to the league organizers and make sure it is ok with them first, that way if any parents approach, you can tell them that you have talked to the league people. If the parent is ok with it, then have fun. Just don't post them online without permission. It's always better to be cautious, than have to deal with angry parents after.
 
lol Paige I'm on the other side. As a mother I'd be unhappy about someone taking pics of my kids without some sort of explanation. Having a DSLR isn't a pass by any means, since everyone and their mother now owns one.

However Robo's suggestion is a good one, if I had some sort of heads up from the coach or something, I'd be more likely to be ok.
 
And take pictures of both teams, and all the players. Don't just focus on on player. There is a dude I see all the time at youth basketball games. The parents know him now, and he sells some photos to them as well. Brings a printer with him.
 
lol Paige I'm on the other side. As a mother I'd be unhappy about someone taking pics of my kids without some sort of explanation. Having a DSLR isn't a pass by any means, since everyone and their mother now owns one.

However Robo's suggestion is a good one, if I had some sort of heads up from the coach or something, I'd be more likely to be ok.

I would absolutely have an issue of someone taking photos of my kids at the park, museum, or any random place. But if someone was at my kids soccer game shooting photos of all the kids playing, that is where I would not have an issue. I do agree that you should ok it with the coach first though ;)
 
In my personal experience, waving around a "big fancy camera" will allow you more freedom. If you have a DSLR people won't think much about it because they're assuming your a professional/artist. At least, that's my personal experience.

Just the opposite happens. People are impressed by "big fancy cameras" but I get asked all the time when shooting. People don't assume anything other than "who is this person taking pictures of my 12 year old, and why"
 
In my personal experience, waving around a "big fancy camera" will allow you more freedom. If you have a DSLR people won't think much about it because they're assuming your a professional/artist. At least, that's my personal experience.
Just the opposite happens. People are impressed by "big fancy cameras" but I get asked all the time when shooting. People don't assume anything other than "who is this person taking pictures of my 12 year old, and why"
Yeah, that's why I said personal experience not its absolute. When I had a compact P&S people would look at me like "what the hell?" and then when I got my coolpix ( a P&S disguised as an SLR/bridge) people pretty much ignored more and didn't care. When I got my DSLR parents actually took it step further and told their kids to cooperate with me when they noticed I was trying to get a shot :lol: . But this is just personal I know it's not going to be that way for everyone. Bottom line, if you're in the US if it's public (unless the facility states otherwise) minors are not off limits. You have complete rights to shoot what you want to shoot. You just have to decide if possibly dealing angry/concerned parents are worth it. What Eric said is really true. If you want to do something, don't look apologetic about it or look like you're doing something wrong and most times people won't assume you are.
 
lol Paige I'm on the other side. As a mother I'd be unhappy about someone taking pics of my kids without some sort of explanation. Having a DSLR isn't a pass by any means, since everyone and their mother now owns one.

However Robo's suggestion is a good one, if I had some sort of heads up from the coach or something, I'd be more likely to be ok.

Really depends on where the activities are taking place. On a public soccer field? On a public ice arena?
 
I'm pretty sure schools aren't considered public?

 
This is an interesting debate. I personally try to stay away from people photography, particularly children. I believe that taking a picture of a person, under 18 or not, can get you in troublue without getting full permission. Down where I live, some people have asked me for money for taking their picture. ¬¬
 
Bossy said:
I'm pretty sure schools aren't considered public?

Doesn't have to be public property though! No expectation of privacy at a sports event. The school can prohibit people from taking pictures...
 

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