Professional photographers - props/wardrobe.

maybeshewill

TPF Noob!
Joined
Oct 3, 2011
Messages
64
Reaction score
1
Location
Melbourne, Australia
Hey everyone, I'm interested to hear from the pros exactly how you all acquire props/wardrobe for photoshoots?

I have been viewing many photographers shots, and seen them with various props and different costumes that I wonder how on earth they have such a variety of things (in my head I'm picturing a huge garage filled to the brim of random stuff lol). I can't imagine people have large enough studios to keep all of this stuff in?! I mean, I see a variety of fancy couches/chairs, country and western backdrops, fans (the chinese ones), umbrellas, cars, toys etc etc.

Are these props often hired for specific shoots? How on earth does one photographer have so many different props/furniture across their photos?

I am also wondering a few things in regards to wardrobe. I'd imagine costumes are probably supplied by the photographer or hired? What about, say for boudoir shoots? I'd imagine people would be asked to bring in their own lingerie for these correct? I couldn't imagine it would be hygienic for a photographer to have a whole bunch of underwear for models to choose from when they get to the shoot?

I'm just intrigued. I see the one photographer just has photos with so many different couches/props/chairs/beds/background sets and I've always wondered if they actually do own all these things, where on earth would they store them?

Sorry for the weird questions lol.
 

table1349

Been spending a lot of time on here!
Joined
Sep 9, 2006
Messages
0
Reaction score
2,772
You doing a shoot of clothes, lawn mowers, what ever, the client provides those items. Need props, go rent what you need. The client pays for them as well. There are stock props that most people will have on hand. You want more or different the client provides them or you rent them. Part of the cost of doing business.
 

KmH

In memoriam
Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2009
Messages
41,401
Reaction score
5,706
Location
Iowa
Website
kharrodphotography.blogspot.com
Can others edit my Photos
Photos OK to edit
Hey everyone, I'm interested to hear from the pros exactly how you all acquire props/wardrobe for photoshoots?
Both rent and buy. Bought stuff usually gets traded, sold after a time.

I have been viewing many photographers shots, and seen them with various props and different costumes that I wonder how on earth they have such a variety of things (in my head I'm picturing a huge garage filled to the brim of random stuff lol). I can't imagine people have large enough studios to keep all of this stuff in?! I mean, I see a variety of fancy couches/chairs, country and western backdrops, fans (the chinese ones), umbrellas, cars, toys etc etc.
One of the things a studio needs is storage space for props and other gear.

Are these props often hired for specific shoots? How on earth does one photographer have so many different props/furniture across their photos?
It depends if it's a retail, or a commercial shoot. Commercial clients get charged rent for any props/gear used for a shoot, including gear/props I own. The rental fee for gear/props I own is compensation for wear & tear.

What about, say for boudoir shoots? I'd imagine people would be asked to bring in their own lingerie for these correct? I couldn't imagine it would be hygienic for a photographer to have a whole bunch of underwear for models to choose from when they get to the shoot?
Yes a retail client would be expected to provide their own wardrobe for both hygienic and sizing reasons.

I'm just intrigued. I see the one photographer just has photos with so many different couches/props/chairs/beds/background sets and I've always wondered if they actually do own all these things, where on earth would they store them?
Consider the time frame the range of photos may have been made in.

A local professional photographer has his studio adjacent to his home. He has 4 sets in the studio plus his generic shooting area. He also has 4 outdoor sets in his back yard. Each set gets updated/changed yearly, so he is pretty much constantly working on updating/changing one of the sets.

Working photographers spend the majority of their time doing non-photography tasks.
 

Big Mike

I am Big, I am Mike
Staff member
Supporting Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2003
Messages
33,896
Reaction score
1,853
Location
Edmonton
Website
www.mikehodson.ca
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
It depends on what you focus on. (pun intended).

If you shoot kids, then you might have a bunch of accessories for kids. If you're more likely to shoot fashion models, then you wont have the same accessories.
Some photographers acquire all sorts of stuff, others might just be good at shooting on location. For example, if you see several different sofas in a photographer's portfolio, I might assume that they are shooting at client's homes or maybe in hotel rooms etc. It's not uncommon to shoot boudoir in a nice hotel, because the room is clean and the furniture probably looks good.

I know a photographer in Eastern Canada who had fariy wings specially made by a costume designer. He has a few specific props to match the theme and a couple times a year, he does a 'fairy day' where people bring their girls to be turned into fairies. He has a Rock Star theme for the boys.

To be the type of photographer who has a lot of props on-hand, you probably have to have a good sized studio where you have room for storage (or maybe a separate storage facility).
 

Christie Photo

No longer a newbie, moving up!
Joined
Jan 7, 2005
Messages
7,199
Reaction score
148
Location
Kankakee, IL
Website
www.christiephoto.com
How on earth does one photographer have so many different props/furniture across their photos?

That's all part of the fun. Like Keith was saying, this stuff does rotate out and new stuff comes in. Some of it is keeping/starting trends, keeping the work fresh.

BUT... partially for this reason, but more for another, I do family portraits in the clients' homes when not working outdoors. With groups larger than 3 or 4 persons, my approach is to shoot full length. This means incorporating the environment. The results are more meaningful, more personal if the setting and all the "stuff" is theirs. I usually have to move some furniture, but its their furniture.

This is just one way to approach props.

-Pete
 

Most reactions

Top