Release forms & general legal advice for Sports photography

Discussion in 'General Shop Talk' started by Tails, Mar 26, 2012.

  1. Tails

    Tails TPF Noob!

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    I was wondering what legal protocols I need to adhere to here in the UK.

    I want to start taking photos of sports events at my university & put the pictures on a Facebook page & possibly sell a few digital unwatermarked copies to anyone who wants to.

    My question is do I need to get each member of the team to sign a release form for each event or can I get them to sign something that will cover me for all the sports they play at my uni. & what about people on the other teams who come into the image & spectators in the background.

    So if I do need to do this, what kind of things would I have in my release form?

    Any Help would be awesome thanks.


     
  2. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The things that your solicitor tells you you need to put in to it. Spend some time on-line, searching 'UK model release' and similar terms. Draft a rough outline of what you think it should contrain based on the samples you see, and take that to a solicitor specializing in [the UK equivalent] of IP law and seek his guidance. In today's litigious society, a small, up-front expenditure for this could save a LOT of pain later.
     
  3. Tony S

    Tony S Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I'm going to bet that universities on that side of the pond are very similar to ones here and have strict rules pertaining to using university athletes in commercial ventures. You most likely not only need the athletes permission, but also the permission of the university.. and if you are making money off the images then you better be ready to pay for the rights to sell them. Not only the athletes, but any logos, mascots, and even combinations of the school colors that identify the school.

    Serious stuff, start first with the university office. You're not the first photographer to want to do this, so the school should have a policy in place. But I'm betting it's going to be something on paper much more significant than a simple release.
     

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