So, I've Bought a D50...

Sagey

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:D Can't wait, should arrive thursday, anyway...
I know theres the problem with old SLR flashes damaging the camera's electrics, (the voltage being too high). But, what if i was to use one of these:
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Nikon-D100-D70-s-D50-flash-adapter-hotshoe-to-PC-sync_W0QQitemZ7598037253QQcategoryZ107933QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
And one of these:
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Flash-PC-Sync-Terminal-Connector-Hotshoe_W0QQitemZ7598478393QQcategoryZ64354QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem


Would i still have the problem as its going through the PC sync cord?
All i need is someway of triggering the flash, I won't need to work out exposures with it as I'll be using in daylight. (For shooting mountain biking, makes the rider clearer). The flash I have is a Jessops 270TBZ and I'm fairly sure the voltage will be too high (my dad used it on his Canon AE-1!)
I don't really want to spend a load more money on a flash seeing as I just spent nearly twice as much as i wanted to!
Meh, It's an investment:wink:

Thanks,
Alex.
 

Big Mike

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OP
S

Sagey

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Hi, thanks for the reply.
From what I've gathered , the camera takes about 6V.
I just tried measuring the flash's voltage and it's apparently 5V! This can't be true, surely!
According to the Botzilla site, the Jessops 220TBZ and the 280 ABZ (which is almost the same as mine I guess, going on the numbers) measure as high as 249V!
My Dad is saying that, because it only uses four 1.5V batteries then that would make it 6V, I'm not convinced.

Thanks again,
Alex.
 

Big Mike

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I really don't know much about electronics but I believe that flash units have a capacitor which stores up the power from the batteries to a higher voltage than the batteries...then dumps it all when it fires.
 

nymtber

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there is probably a few capacitors connected (i cant recall if they are in parallel or series) and maybe even an amplifier circuit, when it charges up, it stores a HECK of a lot of juice, which a capacitor can dump instantly, where as a battery can only give out so much at a time. My professor back in college (i didnt finish) connected a wire between a 1 farad capacitor, when he fliped the switch, there was a loud "pop" and a flash of light, and no more wire ;)

im not an expert, but i did take electrical engineering for 2.5 years, but had to give that up, i got lost :( now i work in a factory...
 

classcams

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there is probably a few capacitors connected (i cant recall if they are in parallel or series) and maybe even an amplifier circuit, when it charges up, it stores a HECK of a lot of juice, which a capacitor can dump instantly, where as a battery can only give out so much at a time. My professor back in college (i didnt finish) connected a wire between a 1 farad capacitor, when he fliped the switch, there was a loud "pop" and a flash of light, and no more wire ;)

im not an expert, but i did take electrical engineering for 2.5 years, but had to give that up, i got lost :( now i work in a factory...
Let us get down to a basic flash. small flash guns have an oscillator to charge up a high voltage capacitor to maybe 300-500 volts from low voltage batteries. Preventing this voltage current from discharging through the flash tube is a thyristor in circuit with the capacitor. This thyristor remains non conductive until a trigger voltage is applied to the thyristor gate. which as its name implies opens the gate to allow the capacitors to discharge. The higher the voltge the brighter the flash, the higher the capacitance the longer the flash duration. It is a little bit more complicated than that but basically thats it.
 

sam_justice

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Like Mike I'm not so good on the electronics side either, but I'd get a Nikon SB flash (one with the CLS) they're some of the best and cheapest speedlights around and you can't go wrong!

Also, good choice! I shot with the D50 for a good 3 years it is a fantastic camera!
 

Light Artisan

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I'd check into the Nissin line, they are a quality company that's been around for many, many years. I have the Di866 and it will act as a commander for other flashes wirelessly (or wired) and has full TTL support.
 

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