The renaissance in film photography goes on

Discussion in 'Articles of Interest' started by Fred von den Berg, Jan 28, 2018.

  1. Fred von den Berg

    Fred von den Berg No longer a newbie, moving up!

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  2. cgw

    cgw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Not again...Articles like this recall the title of Errol Morris's book, "Believing is Seeing."
    Buried deep in the Reflex Kickstarter page is their "production" schedule--fall 2018...maybe. So many 35mm cameras of all flavors, shapes and varieties kicking around sorta beg the question: why? So tired of the vinyl analogy. I can still get film and processing, so obviously it's still being consumed and produced in numbers sufficient to keep it on the shelves. That's all that matters. Somehow, though, I've yet to see a "revival" on the scale these articles report but never document.
     
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  3. Fred von den Berg

    Fred von den Berg No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    ^
    Lots of second hand cars out there, so why buy a new one? As the article mentions, using film isn't only a matter of nostalgia, it's appealing to both older as well as newer photographers, so those who have experience of film as well as those newly discovering this medium. I think the point is that the group involved want to produce a now camera for the now film users.

    On that point, the camera does admittedly look a little retro.
     
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  4. Ysarex

    Ysarex Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    It would be nice to see continued production of new film cameras. Pushing film photography into an exclusively used camera market feels kind of like driving in Cuba. So it's encouraging that someone is thinking about it. Now we need someone competent to think about it. These folks have made a huge glaring design error with this camera and if they can't fix it then this camera is a bust. In the transition from the 1960s to the 1970s we saw the advance in SLR design include open aperture metering. In the 1950s we got the light meter built into the camera and by the early 1960s that meter was linked to the shutter and f/stop controls on the camera -- turn the shutter knob and the meter readout changed, turn the f/stop ring and the meter readout changed. But in earliest implementations of a linked metering system the f/stop had to be set to the taking aperture to meter. This was stopped down metering. The huge design advance in the 1960s was allowing the meter to function with the aperture held fully open and then stopping down to the taking f/stop only at the instant of exposure. Anybody who remembers the little pin sticking out of the back of M42 mount lenses understands. You need to both focus and compose with the lens wide open -- you can't do those two things with the lens stopped down to the taking aperture. We called that design advance open aperture metering. Try photographing a sporting event in which you first have to focus the lens and compose the shot. Then push a button to force the aperture to close down so you can meter the scene and then finally with the aperture stopped down take the photo. That's how this camera works, which is to say it doesn't.

    You could argue that it's OK to design a new film camera that's only appropriate for landscape and still life photography. Fine, then why make it 35mm. When I used to shoot landscapes with film I used bigger film. When I grabbed a 35mm camera I was headed to photograph an event -- something where the tripod wasn't going to work. Open aperture metering makes event photography work.

    Joe
     
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  5. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I can't see too many people spending $500+ on a brand new, very basic SLR when you can buy something like a lightly used F5 for <$400. I'm sure a few people will go for it, but I don't see it attracting enough people to make a go of it.
     
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  6. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    This on-line article was easy to find on Google. It currently has 8,485 view, 2 shares, and 0 comments. 5 Best Film Cameras That You Can Purchase Brand New - ALC

    I typed in "Does Nikon still make film cameras?" and the above article popped up in the search results.

    So...for a "revival" or "renaissance", seems kinda' weird that out of 8,485 views, this article has 2 people sharing it. I mean, come on...that shows an exceptionally LOW level of excitement about new film cameras.

    Anyway, the kickstarter Reflex camera project sounds tremendously over-engineered. The machining and fitting of the five different slide-on lens mounting platforms? Interchangeable back? And 35mm film? Wow...this thing could be super expensive and incredibly challenging to machine and build. This looks like one man's dream camera. And far more than a small group of people could ever hope to produce. Perhaps at Leica price points, such a camera could be built, but the way the camera industry works, the camera maker also makes the lenses. With five different slide-on lens mounts, this camera kills any and all lens sales from the camera maker, and throws the idea of automatic diaphragm control right out the window...this thing is stepping back to the 1936-1953 era in 35mm SLRs...no auto-diaphragm? Sorry....but this Reflex camera idea is over-thought-or is it under-thought? LOL. Nope...woulda' been much better to have gone with ONE lens mount,like m4 thread mount, or Nikon F-mount, and automatic diaphragm stop-down and full-aperture viewing.
     
  7. AlanKlein

    AlanKlein No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    There are so many good vintage 35mm and medium format film cameras available and great lenses, all so relatively cheap.
     
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  8. Peeb

    Peeb Semi-automatic Mediocrity Generator Supporting Member

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    I picked up a used Nikon F100 with an included nikor 35-105 lens for 100.00 total. It was a nice deal, but hardly in the once-in-a-lifetime category.

    The F100 drives all of my lenses, INCLUDING the modern 'G' series lenses. Why in the world would I spend 5x that for a newer but 'lesser' camera?

    Answer: I would certainly not.
     
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  9. 480sparky

    480sparky Chief Free Electron Relocator Supporting Member

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    I hear that about twice a year. Someone has this grandiose idea to 'bring back' Kodachrome. I'll bet they think it's like developing Ektachrome in your kitchen sink...... 3 chemical baths and you're dropping the film into cardboard frames and into the Carousel they go!

    As much as I loved K25 and would love even more to be able to shoot it today, Kodachrome is gone forever.
     
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  10. cgw

    cgw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Slightly bogus analogy, sorry. And, pardon me, but this Reflex POS isn't a patch on what's floating around on eBay, Craigslist or Kijiji. "Now" film users, unless they're utter dolts, know the difference and wouldn't bother with this latest Kickstarter mirage.
     
  11. Fred von den Berg

    Fred von den Berg No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The thing that I personally find interesting about this is not necessarily the camera in question (though I wouldn't wright it off as a POS without seeing some results from it) but rather that people want new film cameras nowadays at all. The analogy with the second-hand car market is not bogus: at some point the cameras that are available second hand will become unreliable junk that nobody can repair or service. No new cameras means no long-term future for film.
     
  12. cgw

    cgw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The difference in utility between a camera and car should be obvious. That's why new cars are available, no? Film is a residual market that simply won't climb out of the hole it fell into years ago. Believing otherwise is fabulism. Personally, I have multiple examples of favorite 35mm and MF cameras that should hold me. That repair services aren't burgeoning is probably the surest index of that film photography is holding its ground in 2018 but not expanding.
     

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