Time for bricks and bats

A

Anisha Kaul

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Inspired by Mohaimen, I finally took the plunge, the following photographs are from my Vaishno Devi trip.

Please don't mince your words.
They are all morning photographs.
When you say the lightening is bad, then please do bother to tell me what exact camera setting would have improved it.
Please be as specific as you can.

1.
Exposure Time: 1/8 per sec
AV: 4.34 EV (f/4.5)
Metering mode: Pattern
Flash fired: Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode
Focal length: 15.0 mm
Shutter speed: 3.00 EV (1/8 sec.)
ISO: 200
IMG_0923.jpg


2.
Exposure Time: 1/125 sec.
AV: 4.66 EV (f/5.0)
Metering mode: Pattern
Flash fired: Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode
Focal length: 33.7 mm
Shutter speed: 6.97 EV (1/125 sec.)
ISO: 200
IMG_0948.jpg


3.
Exposure Time: 1/1250 sec.
AV: 3.25 EV (f/3.1)
Metering mode: Pattern
Flash fired: Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode
Focal length: 5.0 mm
Shutter speed: 10.28 EV (1/1244 sec.)
ISO: 200
IMG_0970.jpg


4.
Exposure Time: 1/160 sec.
AV: 6.00 EV (f/8.0)
Metering mode: Pattern
Flash fired: Flash did not fire, compulsory flash mode
Focal length: 5.0 mm
Shutter speed: 7.31 EV (1/158 sec.)
ISO: 200
IMG_0973.jpg
 

LaFoto

Just Corinna in real life
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First of all: switch off the date and time stamp in your camera. If anything, it only helps to make a photo look like a snapshot.
With regards to composition, make sure you don't put the subject right into the very centre of your frame. It becomes most obvious in Photo 4, where the tree is right in the middle, with the railing pointing at it there. The photo would have been better composed if you had moved the tree slightly over to either the left or the right. The railing actually competes with your subject, you might have walked up closer and thus left it outside your frame all together...!?
The photo I like best is #2. It asks for just a bit of post processing work, but it sure has merits.
 

tirediron

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I agree with Lafoto's points, and in addition, will add that you could have made a very interesting composition in #4 if you were able to elevate your shooting position such that the handrail appeared to be lower and "point" of the two rails intersected just below the base of the tree. That I think would have made the centered composition work.
 

GrantH

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Why such a long exposure on #1? Was it on a tripod? I think it's way too busy for me personally, and I like busy photographs. To me though at first glance it looked like the building was damaged rather than huge and mansion-esque. I believe this is because the hillslope is shown as well as you shot looking down on the subject rather than being slightly below or just shooting individual buildings.
 
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Anisha Kaul

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Thanks to all of you for taking your time to comment.

First of all: switch off the date and time stamp in your camera. If anything, it only helps to make a photo look like a snapshot.
The timestamp has been put there because it holds precious memories for me, but I definitely want it to be as small and as cornered as possible so that it doesn't distract the attention. Please tell me how to do that?

With regards to composition, make sure you don't put the subject right into the very centre of your frame. It becomes most obvious in Photo 4, where the tree is right in the middle, with the railing pointing at it there.
I should study the rule of thirds once again. But I'd like to tell you that the only reason I chose to keep the
tree centered was that there was nothing on the either side of the tree. The reason of not avoiding the railing was that the railing shows the distance and the depth between the tree and me.

After your comments I realize that the railing has taken away some attention from the tree.

I am not stating the reasons for any sorts of arguments but because if there is a flaw in my thinking I want all of you to correct me.

if you were able to elevate your shooting position such that the handrail appeared to be lower and "point" of the two rails intersected just below the base of the tree. That I think would have made the centered composition work.
Just to confirm that I have understood you:
You mean to say that the railing point should have been at the root of the tree? If yes, then I would have to shoot from the top instead of the plane.

Why such a long exposure on #1?
:redface: I don't have any answers on that one, actually on the LCD, that building appeared brighter when I increased the exposure setting. What is the other way of making the object bright othe rthan using flash?

Was it on a tripod?
No, I am thinking of buying one. I am curious to know what made you ask that? The blur? or something else?

I believe this is because the hillslope is shown as well as you shot looking down on the subject rather than being slightly below or just shooting individual buildings.
I was 2 km above that building, What settings to use when you have to shoot from the top?
 
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Anisha Kaul

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I would also like to add that none of you have commented on the reasons of badness of my other photographs, I mean the light effects and all?
 

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