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Water for mixing Chemistry

BubbaBear

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It's been a long time since I was in a darkroom and way back then I used tap water. But reading everything today says not to use it. I was planning on using distilled from the grocery. Is that OK? And what about heating it for mixing.My darkroom is in the basement so I have no stove nearby. I was thinking about buying a new coffeepot to use for heating water. Then adjusting the water as necessary. How does this sound?
 
It depends on your water supply. I just use tap water for chemicals and only use distilled with PhotoFlo for the final rinse.
 
I use tap water for all the steps and when I remember to get it, I'll use distilled for the final rinse. As for heating the water, what developer are you using? Is this black and white or C41? If you're using distilled, an electric kettle seems more practical than a coffee maker. And if you're using tap water, just mix the hot and cold until you reach the temperature you want.

I've generally found it more of an issue to cool down the water if I overshoot the temperature by a few degrees (my developer is Caffenol at 68F). An ice cube or two usually does the trick.

Edit: Agree with Sparky - it depends on the composition of your water. Not sure what exactly are the relative effects of, say, hard vs soft water.
 
I've been reading a lot and watching YouTubes. D-76 all recommend distilled water and says it needs to be a hot water. I have hot tap water that high. And a good filter. Can I use it instead of distilled? I agree an electric kettle would be better than a coffeepot.
 
Have you seen this? http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/support/techPubs/j78/j78.pdf

The temperature chart is on the 3rd page. It says that the temperature is generally between 65-75F (18-24C) and that effects how long you develop. It's really not that hot - more like room temperature.

Color developing requires hotter water.

I'm sure filtered water would be fine.
 
Warm the water in microwave. And then mix with cold to needed temperature. To mix famous D76 I would use distilled water but why would you use D76 ? Tmax dev. is much better developer which you can use with normal tap water. I don't use photoflo, it is only good if you in the middle of Africa and have to use river water. Just making fun. Film development is an art, it takes time to master it. Factory recommendation should be taken only as an starting point, not as the only right way. Rather the opposite. That's the beauty of b&w film, everyone has to experience it for himself. It is not easy, that's why digital is such a blessing.
 
I was buying a water mixing valve from someone closing a darkroom and the rest of the darkroom came with it including a good supply of D-76.
 
limr, do you know where I can get a chart that compares Kodak films to Ilford films? I was looking at the chart for processing times and wondering how to transfer it to Ilford.
 
limr, do you know where I can get a chart that compares Kodak films to Ilford films? I was looking at the chart for processing times and wondering how to transfer it to Ilford.

You'd probably get a better answer to this on the APUG forum. As for using various developer and film combinations, try the Massive Development Chart.

...... Factory recommendation should be taken only as an starting point, not as the only right way...........

Can we start a "Quote of the Month" contest? I'll nominate this.
 
There's also the Comprehensive Development Chart: The Comprehensive Dev Chart | Darkroom Solutions

Although, they seem to have redesigned the site since I was there last and it does not seem to want to give many developing choices for 120 film :048: That's kind of annoying. I'm not sure if they've not finished setting it up, or if you have to just put in 135 as the size just to get the full list of developers. It will still get you the developing time.

Both websites give a developing time of 7.5 minutes for stock dilution and developing HP5+ in D-76 at box speed (400 ISO), and that will be the time for 35mm or 120 or sheet.

D-76 is a standard developer and good to start with. Ultimately there might be other developers that you'll like better, but first figure out what you want to achieve, and if it turns out D-76 doesn't suit that, then try others. But to start off with, I say make it as simple as possible to get re-acclimated to the darkroom.

Getting excited to see some pictures :)
 
...... Factory recommendation should be taken only as an starting point, not as the only right way...........

Can we start a "Quote of the Month" contest? I'll nominate this.
That's funny, but as a quote is not mine, I was born waaay to late to figure out such a smart thing on my own. :bek113:
 
Sparky, the Massive Developement Chart looks like what I need. But I have two questions. What are the reasons for choosing various dilutions? Second I am puzzled by the ISO choices. The film chosen is a certain ISO. Why these other choices?
 
Sparky, the Massive Developement Chart looks like what I need. But I have two questions. What are the reasons for choosing various dilutions? Second I am puzzled by the ISO choices. The film chosen is a certain ISO. Why these other choices?

Different solutions result in different results in things like film grain, tonality, dynamic range, etc.

You can intentionally over- or under-expose film to alter the range of tones in the negative. This is common when using the Zone System. For instance, for very dull, flat scenes, one would underexpose and overdevelop the film to increase the contrast.
 
Plus for different developers effective ISO might be different. There are developers like D76 slowing down the film, others, less solvant developers make film apparently faster.
 
Sparky, I'm sorry but I don't completely understand about the different ISO's. There are a whole bunch of different ones for the same film. Are these development times for those who intentionally shoot the film at a different ISO and therefore a different development time? I am not clear. Take a look at Ilford Delta 100 Pro for example. What would I follow if I were doing it all as an average no special effects roll.
 

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