What are the important differences between the D7100 and D7200

Discussion in 'Nikon Cameras' started by Auslese, Oct 25, 2015.

  1. Auslese

    Auslese TPF Noob!

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    I have the 7100 and can not find any advantage in the 7200, true it has a tiny amount more pixels, that are likely at the edge of the sensor and will never be seen in an image, and it has more useless movie stuff, buy a camcorder. So is there any reason to upgrade to the 7200, as I might be looking to add a second camera so I have a wide angle at hand always.


     
  2. jaomul

    jaomul Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    If the buffer in the d7100 is good enough no need to upgrade. I've had both, the d7200 is slightly better, but not "I'll upgrade" better.

    Why did I upgrade?

    I sold Nikon gear to go all Olympus and after seeing that an EM1,as good as it is ,could not track birds in flight, I changed my mind
     
  3. Auslese

    Auslese TPF Noob!

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    I am actually considering a second body and as such am leaning to the 7100 again. By the buffer I assume you mean the amount of shots held in camera ram before downloading to the card, which when full restricts further shooting? I have mine max out often while tracking my dog on points, but rarely lose a shot due to this.
     
  4. jaomul

    jaomul Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    If you are happy with the d7100 I'd go the same again for a back up for two reasons,

    Price- good deals now on d7100

    Controls/menu- similar but slightly different between the two cameras, none being better or worse, but it could catch you out if you needed to change some settings very fast
     
  5. cgw

    cgw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    No shortage of "D7100-vs-7200" info online. See for yourself. There very likely will be holiday season sales/promos on the D7100 soon. Like it? Get another when the price is right.
     
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  6. KmH

    KmH In memoriam Supporting Member

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  7. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    Raw capture buffer in the D7200 was improved quite a significant amount over what the D7100 can shoot. D7200's sensor is just a bit better when raw images are deliberately underexposed and then adjusted in software later. There has been a NEW firmware update for the D7100, which is supposed to reduce the banding that it is known for on severely under-exposed images which are later adjusted in software, but I have not heard how well that firmware update for the D7100 actually works from real-live people...so...

    Black Friday might have some added $100 off deals on D7100's; cgw keeps pretty good tabs on prices, but he's located in Canada. Nikon has been doing a lot of discounting on its older models, and has trained its buyers to look for deals. I think we'll see some D7100 deals this Thanksgiving season, for sure.

    This whole deliberately underexpose in the field then "lift" the images later in software deal has become more and more an accepted way to get to higher ISO levels, especially for users of Sony- and Toshiba-sensored d-slr cameras over the past couple years, because the sensors used in those cameras can create image files that look pretty good when that is done; if you want to literally SEE, with your own eyes, how that works, check out the dPreview web site's review of the Nikon D7200. They are calling this trait "ISO invariance", and they have sample images from multiple cameras, under-exposed by four and five stops, and you can compare the results that different cameras/sensors can achieve.

    The sensor in the D7200 is probably the most ISO-invariant sensor they've ever tested--which is a very good thing.
     

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